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CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio in 1980s.

CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers,compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio in 1980s.

CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, the ratio that compares to 42 times in 1980s.

Sentence one is from the reputable source... Later two are my version...What I am trying to understand is :

1. What is the significance of AS in first sentence? Any difference between as compared to 42 times their pay/compared to 42 times...?

2."the ratio in 1980s" seems to me like a appositive; is it not awkward ? It seems as if trying to modify PAY?

3. Will summative clause in sentence 3 gives same sense as the sentence 1? If not why?

Please explain.....

Thank you
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Your sentence should be constructed using "compared with" or "compared to".

Use "compared with" when you are looking for differences.

E.g. CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared with 42 times their pay in the 1980's.

Use "compared to" when highlighting (or comparing) the similarities of one thing to another.

E.g. The human heart can be compared to a pump.

Or, as Shakespeare said "...how shall I compare thee to a summers day....

The use of "compared to" and "compared with" might just be the most common error in written and spoken English.

Nobody gets it correct - except you, now :-)
Comments  
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Thanks for your reply JohnParis, However, I was sort of trying to understand the usage of as compared to... Can you give me some insights?

Thank you
Well, use of "as" is almost always superfluous when the sentence is constructed correctly using "compared with" or "compared to" (especially when writing about ratios).
JohnParisWell, use of "as" is almost always superfluous when the sentence is constructed correctly using "compared with" or "compared to" (especially when writing about ratios).
What I think is -Adding as should make the phrase prepositional, thereby,making it adverbial phrase, that modifies

Why do you think as is superfluous?

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I think the slightest difference between "as compared to" and "compared to" can only be perceived if you really are a grammar-niac.

I'll put out two sentences and if they still don't make sense, leave a post.

1.Mary thinks she loves me more, compared to Lisa

2.Mary thinks she loves me more, as compared to Lisa

(Lousy e.g., I know, but good enough to explain the significant modification of a mere "as")