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But despite all this, throughout the early 2010s the grammar and syntax of formal political power stayed the same, as did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it.


In the sentence above:

Is as did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it a preposition phrase?

(I think it is.)

Is "did" a dummy one?

(I think it is.)

Is the NP the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it an extraposed subject in the preposition complement?

(I'm not sure about it, but I'm inclined to think that it is.)

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I read did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it like this:

[But despite all this, throughout the early 2010s] (...) the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it stayed the same.

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tkacka15Is the NP the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it an extraposed subject in the preposition complement?

I'd say it's just the subject. The subject and verb (did) have been inverted, as is typical (but optional) after "as":

Italy produces many excellent wines, and Spain does too.
Italy produces many excellent wines, as does Spain.

CJ

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But despite all this, throughout the early 2010s the grammar and syntax of formal political power stayed the same, as did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it.

tkacka15In the sentence above: Is "as did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it" a preposition phrase?

Yes: a PP with a comparative clause as complement of "as".

tkacka15Is "did" a dummy one?(I think it is.)

I don't follow you: a dummy what?

tkacka15Is the NP "the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it" an extraposed subject in the preposition complement?(I'm not sure about it, but I'm inclined to think that it is.)

No, what makes you think it might be?

tkacka15I read "did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it" like this:[But despite all this, throughout the early 2010s] (...) the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it stayed the same.

It's a comparison of equality between two variables:

"... the grammar and syntax of formal political power stayed x; the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it stayed y; x=y".

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Comments  
BillJI don't follow you: a dummy what?

I see it as a meaningless verb filling the position of predicator.

BillJtkacka15Is the NP "the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it" an extraposed subject in the preposition complement?(I'm not sure about it, but I'm inclined to think that it is.)No, what makes you think it might be?

The finite clause did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it, the complement in the PP, doesn't have a subject preceding "did", so, in my opinion, the following NP functions as the extraposed subject.

tkacka15I don't follow you: a dummy what? I see it as a meaningless verb filling the position of predicator.

No: this is not the dummy auxiliary "do" but the lexical pro-form "do", used anaphorically with the VP "stayed the same" as its antecedent.

tkacka15The finite clause did the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it, the complement in the PP, doesn't have a subject preceding "did", so, in my opinion, the following NP functions as the extraposed subject.

The subject is the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it. It has been postposed to a position at the end of the clause, following the pro-form "did". Compare the basic the grammar and syntax of formal political power stayed the same, as the lens through which the media tended to evaluate and report on it did.

The subject NP has probably been postposed because of its 'weight', i.e. length and complexity.


Extraposition, by contrast, involves moving a subordinate clause subject to a post-verbal position and replacing it with the dummy pronoun "it".

Note that NPs cannot be extraposed.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.