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Hi,

Can you clarify my confusion regarding the usage of the phrases, "as follows" and "as follow"?
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AnonymousResponse is:

they are as follow

that is as follows

I don't think so. Please have a look at the posts above yours in this thread and at the following usage note from The Columbia Guide to Standard American English .

Whether the preceding matter is plural or not, as follows is always singular: The reasons for these decisions are as follows. To use as follow instead is sufficiently precious sounding to make your reader break stride: don’t do it. You can use the following instead, but you needn’t. Less stiff would be The reasons for these decisions are these, or Here are my reasons, or My reasons are, first,…, and the like.
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Hello, it has to be as follows.
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Do you mean that "as follow" can not be used in any circumstances?

I have witnessed cases where people used "as follow, " like this (eventhough not in these exact sentences)

Two explanations you requested are as follow:

Not, two explanations you requested are as follows:

I might be wrong but it seems to me when one item or thing is being mentioned in a sentence as a subject, it follows up with "as follows", but when you are making a sentence with multiple items or things, it is right to use "as follow" with no "s" in the end of the verb. Right or WRONG?
Hello Anon

To my mind, the "as follows" doesn't relate to the content of the following text, but the text itself as a whole, i.e.

1. The two explanations you requested are as (in the text that) follows...

So I would call "as follow" incorrect. But other posters may have other opinions!

MrP

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Please refer to information obtained from URL>>> http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/follows
Usage Note: As follows (not as follow) is the established form of the idiom regardless of whether the noun that precedes it is singular or plural: The regulations are as follows.
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Yes I agree.
As follows = "as it follows"
Response is:

they are as follow

that is as follows
 Tanit's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi Anon

Please read the explanations from Nona, MrPedantic and Tanit in this thread.

The standardly used expression is "as follows".