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1. As he said, we need change our business goals.

2. Like what he said, we need to change our business goals.

I know #1 is correct, but is #2 equally correct?
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New2grammar1. As he said, we need change our business goals.

2. Like what he said, we need to change our business goals.

I know #1 is correct, but is #2 equally correct?

You could say that again.
No, 2 is not correct English. You will hear people say it, but it is not correct.
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Nona The BritNo, 2 is not correct English. You will hear people say it, but it is not correct.
Hi, Nona, if we move "Like what he said" to the end of the sentence, what do you think?

We need to change our business goals like what he said.

Could you accept it now? If not, why not?

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Nona The BritNo, 2 is not correct English. You will hear people say it, but it is not correct.
Hi, Nona, if we move "Like what he said" to the end of the sentence, what do you think?

We need to change our business goals like what he said.

Could you accept it now? If not, why not?
Not much better. "Like what he said" is bad English.
The use of like as a conjunction is informal.

Like what he said, we need to change our business goals.
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1. As he said, we need change our business goals. (I believe this is BrE.)

2. Like what he said, we need to change our business goals. (I believe this is AmE.)
In summary, we can't replace 'as he said' with 'like what he said', though 'like he said' is still acceptable informally.

However, 'like what he said' is still correct in certain sentences that do not share the meaning of 'as he said'. For example,

He finds out that the public doesn't like what he said, so he changes it.

Please correct me if I am wrong.
>He finds out that the public doesn't like what he said, so he changes it.

This is correct, but has a totally different meaning. This is the VERB like.
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