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Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There's nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we're liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

As honored as I would be had President Mandela quoted my words, indeed he did not. I have no idea where that story came from, but I am gratified that the paragraph has come to mean so much to so many people.

Q1:
Please help me with the sentences in blue above. If I don't feel secure around my parents, then that would mean I don't feel protected or secured when I'm with them. No definition of 'enlightened ' fits here. 'shrinking', perhaps means not interesting yourself in what you were meant to because you feel you aren't capable...

Q2:
First 'As' is used as 'though' and I think the second as 'like'. Correct?
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1) Rough paraphrase: "You won't be of benefit to the world by behaving as if you are insignificant. It is not wise to be shy and retiring just to avoid making others feel uneasy and inadequate."

2) "As honored as I would be" = "Honored as I would be"= "Honored though I would be".

However, you can't say "As honored though I would be", and I can't think of any direct substitutes for the two as's in "As honored as I would be" that would retain the same meaning.

It's probably easiest to think of "as ... as" as a set expression and not worry too much about assigning individual meanings.
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Hi, Mr Wordy
Mr WordyIt is not wise to be shy and retiring just to avoid making others feel uneasy and inadequate."
This part is not making much sense to me. Why is the writer trying to say? I'm not shy and retired because I think that presrnt would be make others uncomfortable, it's just that I don't have confidence and faith in myself to face the world - a kind of psychoogical problem. Why would someone do that on the thought of making others uneasy?

I know what you mean by treating 'as ... as' as a set expression but here 'As honored as I would be had Preseident...', in my humble opinion, 'as ... as' phrase makes sense even when looked in terms of individual meanings. 'as honored as', I'm as honored as I would be have been if the president had mentioned my name in his speech, here 'as honored' would mean 'I'm honored to the same degree/extent...'. Am I thinking along the right line?

Thanks
Jack
Jackson6612Why is the writer trying to say? I'm not shy and retired because I think that presrnt would be make others uncomfortable, it's just that I don't have confidence and faith in myself to face the world - a kind of psychoogical problem. Why would someone do that on the thought of making others uneasy?
The writer seems to think that the people he or she is addressing behave in a "shrinking" (i.e. shy and retiring) way in order to avoid making others feel insecure. Why he or she should think that I have no idea.
Jackson6612 'as honored as', I'm as honored as I would be have been if the president had mentioned my name in his speech, here 'as honored' would mean 'I'm honored to the same degree/extent...'. Am I thinking along the right line?
Not quite, I don't think. It does not mean "I'm as honoured as I would have been if the president had quoted my words". It means "I would have been honoured if the president had quoted my words".