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Could you tell me how you would writes these please?

- His going out at 7PM is the same as if he had gone out a 8PM.
- What more would you have done if they weren't here than if they were here.

PAST

- My tiredness has past, I'm no longer tired now.

- I'm past you on the show. You're on episode 4 I'm on episode 6.

- French athletes need not be pitied/wept for, [nonetheless] they are far behind/far from being Tiger Woods. (meaning not as good as him.) (what tense is NEED NOT BE?)
- If the skin under the cast is itchy/cast itches, call a doctor.

Thank you
Comments  
Could someone please be so kind as to take a look at this for me?

THank you
alc24- His going out at 7PM is the same as if he had gone out a 8PM.
The meaning of the sentence is not quite there. You are saying his going out at 7 is the same as if he hypothetically went out at 8.

I think you mean this:



His going out at 7pm is the same as his going out at 8pm.
alc24- What more would you have done if they weren't here than if they were here.
Sounds inellegant, but fine.
alc24My tiredness has past, I'm no longer tired now.
Comma splice and spelling error. Needs to be My tiredness has passed. I'm no longer tired now.

alc24I'm past you on the show. You're on episode 4 I'm on episode 6
"I have passed you...

alc24French athletes need not be pitied/wept for, [nonetheless] they are far behind/far from being Tiger Woods. (meaning not as good as him.) (what tense is NEED NOT BE?)
This is fine, except for the comma splice. Present tense.
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Thank you.

For the last sentence NEED NOT BE, what form is it, is it the same as SHOULDN'T BE ? Could you give me a couple of examples as I couldn't find it in the dictionary.

Thank you
English 1b3"]French athletes need not be pitied/wept

Need is a semiauxiliary, meaning it can function as either an ordinary (lexical) verb or an auxiliary verb, as in your sentence above.

The auxiliary need is mainly used to ask for or give permission. It is not used to talk about habitual or general things.

  • You need not work today. (Auxiliary - Particular occasion)

  • You don't need to work on Sundays. (Ordinary - habitual thing)

  • You need not pay for this call. (Auxiliary - Particular occasion)

  • In most countries, you don't need to pay for emergency calls. (Ordinary - general thing)


  • Note from the examples above need as an ordinary verb takes a to-infinitive whereas as an auxiliary takes the bare infintivei--a common difference between modal (auxiliary) verbs and ordinary verbs.

Wish is another verb that serves as an auxiliary, except its syntax is that of a full verb, that is, with the to-infinitive.

I wish not to go.
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Thank you very much it was very clear.

Thank you