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a. I heard a thump as of a body falling.

Is 'as' above being used as it's being used in the two below definitions?

If so, does as mean for example in each case?

scoured: A place that has been scoured, as by flushing with water.
gouge: A scooping or digging action, as with such a chisel.

Finally, does this sentence below differ from a in that this one states that the thump was definitely that of a body falling?

b. I heard a thump of a body falling.

Thanks
Comments  
I wouldn't say that you could replace "as" with "for example" in any of the three cases.
You could add "for example" parenthetically after each "as."

I think it would be a lot of work to replace "as," as you would need to repeat the description of the action.

similar to what one would hear if a body fell.

similar to the way it would appear if it had been flushed with water.

similar to the action of scooping or digging with such a chisel.
(such as one would perform with such a chisel.)

this one states that the thump was definitely that of a body falling

True.
Hi,

a. I heard a thump as of a body falling.

Is 'as' above being used as it's being used in the two below definitions? Yes.

If so, does as mean for example in each case? No. It means 'like the thump of a body falling'.

scoured: A place that has been scoured, as by flushing with water.
gouge: A scooping or digging action, as with such a chisel.

Finally, does this sentence below differ from a in that this one states that the thump was definitely that of a body falling? Yes.

b. I heard a thump of a body falling.

Clive
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Thanks very much guys.

So the other two mean:

A place that has been scoured like a place that has been scoured (as) by flushing with water.

A scooping or digging action, like a scooping or digging action (as) with such a chisel.

Is there alternative words to use (not as or like...)?

Would you say its use (its being as) in this way is confined to certain contexts? It seems mostly to be used in dictionary definitions... If it is mainly used in dictionaries, what is the more typical way to say this? I can't think of anything

Thanks
Hi,

So the other two mean: Yes, that's the idea

A place that has been scoured like a place that has been scoured (as) by flushing with water.

A scooping or digging action, like a scooping or digging action (as) with such a chisel.

Is there alternative words to use (not as or like...)? look for synonyms of 'like'

Would you say its use (its being as) in this way is confined to certain contexts? It seems mostly to be used in dictionary definitions... Not just definitions, but it's a literary, formal way of expressing the idea.

If it is mainly used in dictionaries, what is the more typical way to say this? I can't think of anything

Simply eg?

Clive
CliveSimply eg?

In your above post you said 'for example' was not the right word, and now you're saying it is... or have I misinterpreted something?
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Hi,

I don't feel the two questions were exactly the same.

In your first post, you asked me about the meaning.

In the later post, you asked me about a more typical way it is said.

Another way to look at the matter is this.

If you ask enough questions about some fairly subtle and uncommon aspect of the English language, you are likely eventually to get some answer that seems not totally consistent. Then you can have the pleasure of pointing that out. Emotion: big smile

Clive
CliveI don't feel the two questions were exactly the same.
In your first post, you asked me about the meaning.
In the later post, you asked me about a more typical way it is said.
Thought that may have been the case. Thanks.

I Certainly don't take in pleasure in pointing out any inconsistencies. Only wastes your time, time you can spend helping others.

Sorry if it came out that way.