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1.The problem can be solved as easily.

2.The problem can be solved just as easily.

3.The problem can be solved twice as easily in the way.

4.The problem cannot be solved as easily.

5.The problem cannot be solved just as easily.

6.The problem cannot be solved twice as easily in the way.

7.This problem is as easy to solve.

8.This problem isn't as easy to solve.

9.This problem is just as easy to solve.

10.This problem isn't just as easy to solve.

What are the correct sentences given these ten sentences?

I think that except 1 and 7, the rest are all correct English. Maybe can even 1 and 7 be correct according to context?

Or if they're all wrong, can they be correct according to context?

+1

All these sentences need additional context to answer the question "As easy/easily as what?". I'll assume that this context is present.

#3 and #6 are incorrect in their use of "in the way".

#5 and #10 seem a bit unusual in their use of "just" with a negative, but I would not say that they are actually wrong.

The others are OK.

You need a space after your numbers. For example, this is incorrect spacing:

1.The problem can be solved as easily.

while this is correct spacing:

1. The problem can be solved as easily.

1 2
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GPYGPY

Thank you very much

Then in what context can I say 1,4,7,8?

Would you provide context for each case?

I really want to know. Of course, there's not "as what".

fire1 Of course, there's not "as what".

With "as easy/easily" (or any analogous "as + adj./adv."), there is always an explicit or implied "as what". For example:

The first problem can be solved as easily as the second.
I did the first problem very quickly, but this one isn't as easy to solve.
(i.e. not as easy as the first problem)
Using the new method, the problem can be solved twice as easily. (i.e. twice as easily as with the old method)

In this particular respect, all your sentences are the same.

GPYGPY

Thank you very much.

Maybe can "the problem can be solved as easily" be used in this case below?

A : “The problem emerged so easily!”

B : “Well, the problem can be solved as easily.”

If B is correct, can "the problem can be solved just as easily", as a response to A, be used instead of B?

And could you provide context for "the problem is easy to solve" ?

I can't figure out anything.


And are both sentences X and Y the same in meaning and correct English?

Some native speakers argue that there must be "just", but should "just" be inserted?


‎X. He drove a Cadillac, but it could just as easily have been a Ford.

Y. He drove a Cadillac, but it could as easily have been a Ford.

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GPYGPY

But it seems like in the case below, only C seems to work.

‎A. Do you think that he can pass the entrance exam?


B. Yeah, I think he can pass it as easily.

C. Yeah, I think he can pass it just as easily.

Which sentence is correct English as a response to sentence A, given B and C?

I think that "just" must be included.

fire1A : “The problem emerged so easily!”
B : “Well, the problem can be solved as easily.”
If B is correct, can "the problem can be solved just as easily", as a response to A, be used instead of B?

B is possible, with or without "just", in the interpretation that "as easily" implies "as easily as it emerged".

It feels somewhat unusual to say that a problem emerged "easily", though I suppose not impossible.

fire1And could you provide context for "the problem is easy to solve" ?

This does not need any more context -- other than, obviously, knowledge of which problem is being referred to.

fire1Some native speakers argue that there must be "just", but should "just" be inserted?‎
X. He drove a Cadillac, but it could just as easily have been a Ford.
Y. He drove a Cadillac, but it could as easily have been a Ford.

"just" is optional here, just as it is (as far as I can think) in every analogous case of "(just) as + adj./adv.". If included, it adds a sense of the "as ... as ..." comparison being precise, or easily fulfilled, or something like that. It does not substantially change the meaning, and sometimes may do little more than "lubricate" the sentence.

fire1But it seems like in the case below, only C seems to work.‎
A. Do you think that he can pass the entrance exam?
B. Yeah, I think he can pass it as easily.
C. Yeah, I think he can pass it just as easily.
Which sentence is correct English as a response to sentence A, given B and C? I think that "just" must be included.

Neither B nor C makes apparent sense (with no more context/information), as there is no apparent answer to "As easily as what?"

GPYfire1Some native speakers argue that there must be "just", but should "just" be inserted?‎X. He drove a Cadillac, but it could just as easily have been a Ford.Y. He drove a Cadillac, but it could as easily have been a Ford."just" is optional here, just as it is (as far as I can think) in every analogous case of "(just) as + adj./adv.". If included, it adds a sense of the "as ... as ..." comparison being precise, or easily fulfilled, or something like that. It does not substantially change the meaning, and sometimes may do little more than "lubricate" the sentence.

Thank you very much!

Is this because why some native speakers argue that if there is the word "just" in front of "as easily", the sentence can be stand alone without adding more information "as what"?


and then maybe in this context below,

- Acts of terrorism, he said when I saw him in November, usually arise from some cause deep in the past and will not go away until the root problem is addressed. He could as easily have been talking about the demonstrations of discontent being staged in his homeland nearly a half-century since he saw it last.

Is "could as easily have been" correctly used?

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GPYfire1But it seems like in the case below, only C seems to work.‎A. Do you think that he can pass the entrance exam?B. Yeah, I think he can pass it as easily.C. Yeah, I think he can pass it just as easily.Which sentence is correct English as a response to sentence A, given B and C? I think that "just" must be included.Neither B nor C makes apparent sense (with no more context/information), as there is no apparent answer to "As easily as what?"

Then if someone says "E. Do you think that he can pass the entrance exam like his sister", can B and C be used as a response to E? and in this case, B and C do make sense?

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