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(1) It takes as much as two hours to get to the station.
(2) It takes as many as two hours to get to the station.

Are they both equally OK? Or is one better than the other?
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Comments  
It’s a difficult one.

I’d use “as long as”.

Curious to read native speakers’ responses.

Taka(1) It takes as much as two hours to get to the station.
(2) It takes as many as two hours to get to the station.

Are they both equally OK? Or is one better than the other?
The first sentence is correct.
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Taka,

I recently had a brain cramp over a similar issue. Knowing that hours were countable, I couldn't figure out why "less" sounded better than "few" in something I had written. Fortunately, my friends here reminded me of the rule so I didn't continue to wonder if I was losing my marbles.

Quantities of time and distance can be considered as a giant block of uncountable stuff, so you use less than or as much as instead of fewer than or as many as.
Grammar GeekQuantities of time and distance can be considered as a giant block of uncountable stuff, so you use less than or as much as instead of fewer than or as many as.

That seems helpful! But when you make it interrogative, would you say 'How much hours did you spend walking?' instead of 'How many hours did you spend walking?'?

It should be How many hours did you spend walking?
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Yes, it has to be "how many hours did you..."
Yes, I agree, how many hours, asking about the number of hours.

But I would say "How much of those two hours you allotted for this task did you actually use to complete it?" (Well, I woldn't say that, exactly, because it's an awkward sentence, but you get my point. When you're talking about two or three hours total, as big old block of time, it's back to being uncountable.)
Hi, GG
...to wonder if I was losing my marbles.

...big old block of time

This stuff does read well![Y]Emotion: big smile

But what is "lose one's marbles", an idiom, a slang, or a metaphor? What does it mean?Emotion: indifferent

Thanks in advance!

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