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A. But it is possible that in some early Mahayana sources the expression is not used specifically with reference to Buddhahood as a goal as such. In these cases it may be that the expression 'the Great' was used simply to indicate whatever the ...

(A is an excerpt from an English book about Mahayana Buddhism)

1. Is this part "as a goal as such" correct English?

2. If correct, does "as such" modify "a goal"?

3. Like "as a goal as such", is this structure "as (A)noun phrase as (B)noun phrase" possible when "as (B)noun phrase" modifies "(A)noun phrase"? If possible, could you make some examples? I really want to know..

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fire11. Is this part "as a goal as such" correct English?

Yes.

fire12. If correct, does "as such" modify "a goal"?

Yes.

fire13. Like "as a goal as such", is this structure "as (A)noun phrase as (B)noun phrase" possible when "as (B)noun phrase" modifies "(A)noun phrase"?

I doubt it. "as such" is a unique phrase. "such" isn't a noun there.

Besides, "as NP as NP" is not "a structure". What you have here is two different uses of "as".

1) reference to NP1 as NP2. NP2 is a complement to N1. It's similar to saying that the word or concept NP1 is (or is taken to be) NP2.

with reference to [Buddhahood] as [a goal]

Here's another:

He has deleted a 2008 reference to [Jerusalem] as [the capital of Israel].

These are quite similar to the pattern with a direct object and an object complement: We call [him] [Louie]. They consider [Buddhahood] [a goal]. He called [Jerusalem] [the capital of Israel].


2) NP1 as such. When placed after a noun, this phrase means 'in itself' or 'really'. It's also like the phrase per se.

not ... as such indicates 'not really', 'not exactly'.

not ... a goal as such ~ not ... exactly a goal

The idea is "not exactly what we would normally call a goal".


More examples:

Their main concern is not safety as such, but whether business will be affected.
... is not safety in itself, but ....

This is not an essay as such, since writing an essay was never the objective of this article.
This is not really a essay, since ...

Though the chapel is not a gallery as such, it's a wonderful and moving way to view Matisse's work.
... not really a gallery, it's a ....

CJ

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CalifJimCalifJim

Thank you very much CalifJim!

CalifJimI doubt it. "as such" is a unique phrase. "such" isn't a noun there.

Then is "such" used as a pronoun?


And given this "as NP as phrase", can "phrase" be a complement to NP?

To list cases, for example,... (I just made these examples)

1) Scientists regard the substance as a mass as measured by special instruments.

2) Scientists consider the substance as a mass as energy.

3) Scientists consider the substance as energy as a means of interstellar travel.

As for 1, I used "as measured by special instruments" as a complement to "a mass",

as for 2, I used "as energy" as a complement to "the substance",

as for 3, I used "as a means of interstellar travel" as a complement to "energy".

With this respect, are sentences 1,2,3 all correct English?

If not, could you make some examples?

If so, as for "as NP as phrase", I would like to know as well whether, when "phrase" is "a gerund phrase", "as a gerund phrase" can be a complement to "NP".

CalifJimCalifJim

1) Scientists regard the substance as a mass as measured by special instruments.

And especially, if my sentence 1) is wrong.

As for "as NP as -ed", is there any natural example where "as -ed" works as a complement to NP?


"As -ed" is like "as measured" as in example 1).

fire1Then is "such" used as a pronoun?

Yes.

That's about all I can do for you regarding your post.

Your three examples are all factually false or scientifically suspect, so I'm having trouble analyzing them at all.

Your best bet would be to go onto a site like fraze.it or COCA or Google Ngrams to find examples that fit your criteria.

CJ

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