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As of this coming Friday, I'll be busy working.

Does the above mean "I'll be busy working till this coming Friday" or "I won't by busy working until this coming Friday?" Thanks.
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Comments  
It mean that when Friday comes, you will already be working.
I take it to mean Starting this coming Friday, I'll be busy working.

CJ
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Hi,

Me too, I start work on Friday.

CliveN
CalifJimI take it to mean Starting this coming Friday, I'll be busy working.

CJ

Thanks, Jim and Clive.

My dictionary comments that "as of" means "until" in English English, and "starting; as from" in American English. So, I wonder what English's viewpoints are.
You seem to have a bad dictionary.

Look in this BrE dictionary:

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/default.asp?dict=CALD

for
as of

It's there.
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Angliholic
CalifJimI take it to mean Starting this coming Friday, I'll be busy working.

CJ

Thanks, Jim and Clive.

My dictionary comments that "as of" means "until" in English English, and "starting; as from" in American English. So, I wonder what English's viewpoints are.
It has the meaning "as from" in BrE too. In fact, I have difficulty finding a sentence in which it can be "until".
Hi,

In fact, I have difficulty finding a sentence in which it can be "until".

I guess you could say 'The project will be finished as of Friday'.

But to me it's not clear here whether the last day of work will be the Thursday or the Friday.

Best wishes, Clive
In that case, it seems to me that as of is the "opposite" of until.

To my ear, the following are equivalent.

The project will be finished as of Friday.
= The project will not be finished until Friday.

CJ
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