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Could you please help?
I checked this phrase in some dictionaries, most of them used 'concerning' to express the meaning, but I couldn't replace that in other sentences until I found the other meaning in Cambridge : 'in connection with' that sounds a better translation.

In addition, why I think the phrase in bold is strange? I think it would have been correct if they had used comma like this : "... topics ,as regards losing weight, is concerned and ...". Anyway, I think 'in connection with' is a better phrase to be replaced with.
This could be one of the most hotly debated topics as regards losing weight is concerned and it is something I have wondered about myself whether or not how often you eat can make a difference to how much weight you do or don’t lose.

In here they've used 'as regards' two times, which I think is not proper, so I tried to replace ''concerning' or 'in connection with', but I think they are not fulfill the delicacy of a proper sentence.
... these surely have been unprecedented times in modern history as regards relations between Islam and the West – and certainly in any case as regards American relations with Muslims and the Muslim-majority world.
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This could be one of the most hotly debated topics as regards losing weight is concerned and it is something I have wondered about myself whether or not how often you eat can make a difference to how much weight you do or don’t lose.
In here they've used 'as regards' two times, -- It is OK without any commas, since it defines the topics. The basic problem is that the phrase is awkward in most situations, yet is loved by poor writers. The sentence would be better structurally and semantically like this:

This could be one of the most hotly debated topics on losing weight, and it is something...

...these surely have been unprecedented times in modern history as regards relations between Islam and the West – and certainly in any case as regards American relations with Muslims and the Muslim-majority world.-- This too is OK, but could also be improved by omitting the phrase:

these surely have been unprecedented times in modern history for relations between Islam and the West – and certainly for American relations with Muslims and the Muslim-majority world.
First I should thank you a lot for your excellent answer. Emotion: smile
But there were some parts that I didn't understand.
Mister MicawberIt is OK without any commas, since it defines the topics.
Do you suggest in places that we are defining topics we can omit commas?
Could you please give me some examples that comma is necessary? Like non-defining adjective clauses.
Mister MicawberThis too is OK, but could also be improved by omitting the phrase:these surely have been unprecedented times in modern history for relations between Islam and the West – and certainly for American relations with Muslims and the Muslim-majority world.
Do you mean that I can do the inverse? I mean replacing 'for' with 'as regards'. And can I replace as regards with for in other places?
e.g. You would be a proper choice for the job. ~ You would be a proper choice as regards the job
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youzouDo you suggest in places that we are defining topics we can omit commas?
Yes: they must be.
youzouCould you please give me some examples that comma is necessary? Like non-defining adjective clauses.
My brother John, who is in the Marines, is a tough cookie.
youzouDo you mean that I can do the inverse? I mean replacing 'for' with 'as regards'.
No: that is what I am specifically (but evidently unsuccessfully) warning against.
Mister MicawberMy brother John, who is in the Marines, is a tough cookie.
So in those situations, can we omit the commas?
My brother John who is in the Marines is a tough cookie.
Mister Micawberthat is what I am specifically (but evidently unsuccessfully) warning against.
But you mentioned 'improve' at first, that suggest using 'as regards' is correct also, so I tried to find a way for rephrasing 'for' in similar sentence.
I'm afraid I have to give up on this one. Maybe another member can come up with a new approach.
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The writer of the first sentence is semi-literate. Don't let this sentence bother you. Try to forget you ever saw it. He tried to use the "as" in "as regards" as a sentence conjunction and unwittingly created an Escherian grammar nightmare. This is why it didn't work when you substituted "concerning".

Judicious repetition is good. There is no need to change the second "as regards" in the second sentence. I don't know what it is to fulfill the delicacy of a proper sentence, but be that as it may, you can freely exchange "concerning" or "in connection with" either or both of the "as regards", although I have to say I like "as regards" here.
Thanks, dear enoon. Emotion: smile
enoon I don't know what it is to fulfill the delicacy of a proper sentence
I mean when I replaced them I didn't find them very good. If it is proper if you please teach me their usages I would appreciate it.
enoonbut be that as it may
I guess you mean: "let it be the way that was"? Right?
enoonyou can freely exchange "concerning" or "in connection with" either or both of the "as regards", although I have to say I like "as regards" here.
Again, I would appreciate it if you could teach me how should I use them.
And I should thank you for your answer. Thanks. Emotion: smile
enoonHe tried to use the "as" in "as regards" as a sentence conjunction
I screwed that up. "As" is not being used as a conjunction but as part of a botched attempt at "as far as X is concerned".
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