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Shall I say:

1. It was highlighted that all defective milk have been excluded in the order, on the request of the client.

2. It was highlighted that as per client's request,all defective milk have been excluded in the order

Which one sounds better?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I still see "per your request" from some American native speakers.

Now I'm confused.

The little phrase seems handy and concise to me. ("on the request of the client" is so long.)

Is it really becoming archaic?

Edited: I've just located a powerpoint presentation for a business writing course, and found pretty much the same comment. I guess I'll kiss "per" goodbye Emotion: crying Emotion: crying and start using "at".
'Defective milk' sounds a little odd to me too. Can milk be defective?

MrP
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Bad milk? Sour milk?
Well, I suppose that must be it. But 'defective' seems to suggest 'something that doesn't work'; 'something that fails'. I feel that only things with 'parts' can have 'defects'. Does milk have parts, in that sense?

It's surprising how few adjectives can be applied to milk...

MrP
This really grates me, since "as" and "per" are really the same, so you are saying it twice.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Actually, neither of these sentences are grammatically sound. They should probably read like this...

1. It was highlighted that all defective milk has been excluded from the order upon the request of the client.

2. It was highlighted that as per the client's request, all defective milk has been excluded from the order.