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I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

Why is the perfect tense used in the subordinate clause? Can we just say...

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I check into the hotel.

Please advise.

LC
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I've checked in does say it's done already. Once you have gotten to the point in time when the checking in IS truly in the past (after you finish checking in), THAT is when you will go to the convention center. You will go only after checking in.

Time line: Now....what happens next is: checking in.... after that (now that the checking in is accomplished): go to the convention center.

CJ's post explains it far better. But I thought maybe another approach might help.
As soon as sounds like something will happen, but I've checked into the hotel must be something that has done already.

Yes, that makes sense to me. I think Asperisic has mentioned something like this already. The will is implied in both forms, but never stated explicitly.

as soon as I (*will) check in
as soon as I (*will) have checked in


This is true of almost all the adverbial conjunctions of time.

Does that make more sense now?

CJ

P.S. You could always switch to learning French or Italian. They are more explicit about expressing the willin these constructions. Emotion: smile
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Lcchang
After gathering all different opinions from advisors like you, I would like to tell you my two cents as a non-English native speaker. It might help you understand what we think about this sentence.

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

When I first saw this sentence, I felt that as soon as + I've checked into the hotel is a strange combination. As soon as sounds like something will happen, but I've checked into the hotel must be something that has done already. Therefore, I think using a present tense check into looks easier to me, or just like what Aperisic mentioned, using will have checked into the hotel is also an option. Does that make sense to you? Please advise.

LC

You do not say When I will arrive, I will meet you. although this is exactly what you want to say, you say in English: When I arrive, I will meet you.

Using the same reasoning, you do not say When I will have arrived, I will meet you. you say in English When I have arrived, I will meet you.

[I'll add one post to explain this more.]
Lcchang
After gathering all different opinions from advisors like you, I would like to tell you my two cents as a non-English native speaker. It might help you understand what we think about this sentence.

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

When I first saw this sentence, I felt that as soon as + I've checked into the hotel is a strange combination. As soon as sounds like something will happen, but I've checked into the hotel must be something that has done already. Therefore, I think using a present tense check into looks easier to me, or just like what Aperisic mentioned, using will have checked into the hotel is also an option. Does that make sense to you? Please advise.

LC

Why there is no will in the subordinate time sentence in English?

  1. In English will is so strong with its idea of the future that it passes this tense to a subordinate sentence without mentioning it explicitly.
  2. In English will is not simply the future tense, it has a very softly hidden sense of someone's determination, purpose or decision, either it is a person or God or unnamed force


  3. When there are clouds, it will rain. = in English, very softly, of course, = When there are clouds, it is God who lets the rain down.

    So if you say When I will arrive, I will meet you. you have stressed will, the future, two times and you mixed and doubled your determination(s), so you heavily lost the meaning that the arrival is only the condition of the final action and intention to meet someone.

    When I will arrive = it has very softly, of course, the feeling of When I decide to arrive or even worse the question When will I arrive?, but that is not what your determination in the future really is, you want only to meet someone. When I arrive - the arrival, is only a surrounding condition - not anyone's determination.

    This what I said, I got when I compared the future tense with the other European languages. (For Chinese, though, I still cannot sayEmotion: smile)

    I will arrive and I will meet you, is fine, you do have two intentions, and will cannot pass the future to the separate sentence in any direction (I arrive and I will meet you ???? I will arrive and I meet you ????)

    In English the logical connection with a subordinate time sentence (starting with, for example, when) is weaker than logical strength of modal will, the future. Willprevails.Emotion: smile
CalifJim
As soon as sounds like something will happen, but I've checked into the hotel must be something that has done already.
Yes, that makes sense to me. I think Asperisic has mentioned something like this already. The will is implied in both forms, but never stated explicitly.

as soon as I (*will) check in
as soon as I (*will) have checked in


This is true of almost all the adverbial conjunctions of time.

Does that make more sense now?

CJ

P.S. You could always switch to learning French or Italian. They are more explicit about expressing the willin these constructions. Emotion: smile

Yes. Very clear. Thank you all.
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