+0
I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

Why is the perfect tense used in the subordinate clause? Can we just say...

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I check into the hotel.

Please advise.

LC
1 2
Comments  
I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

Why is the perfect tense used in the subordinate clause?

The present perfect tense is useful for talking about an action that was completed in the recent indefinite past.

(I just got to the hotel and checked in. I'll go to the convention center immediately.)

Can we just say...

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I check into the hotel.

This is OK, too.

Please advise.

LC
Thank you.

LC
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The present perfect tense is used here in future time because it shows more clearly
the action of
checking into the hotel
as leading to the action of
going to the convention center.
How about...

I'll go to the convention center since I've checked into the hotel.

Please advise.

LC
I'll go to the convention center after I've checked into the hotel.
is more feasible (as both actions are seen to be in future time)

I'll go to the convention center since I've checked into the hotel.
OK, I've had this checked with several people and it doesn't sound strange to any of them.
Thus my initial reservation on it was not justified.

I might change the order to:
Since I've checked into the hotel, I'll go to the convention center.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
When the main clause contains an imperative (Go ...), or a tense indicating future time (I'll go, I'm going, I go), a subordinate clause introduced by as soon as, once, or after may contain a simple present or present perfect tense with little difference in meaning. The present perfect simply emphasizes the finishing of the action in the subordinate clause before undertaking the action in the main clause. (The version with the simple present also implies the finishing of one action before undertaking the other, but without so great an emphasis.)

[I'll go / I'm going] to the convention center [as soon as / once / after ] I [check / have checked] into the hotel.

The version with have checked can be paraphrased as:

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I [finish / have finished] checking into the hotel.

CJ
Lcchang
I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

Why is the perfect tense used in the subordinate clause? Can we just say...

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I check into the hotel.

Please advise.

LC

You remove will

I will be there, when I [will] arrive =>I will be there, when I arrive

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I [will] have checked into the hotel. => I'll go to the convention center as soon as I have checked into the hotel.

Both are OK, have checked is more precise and you want to say that you need to do it, probably, or for some other reason you want to stress the action of checking.
After gathering all different opinions from advisors like you, I would like to tell you my two cents as a non-English native speaker. It might help you understand what we think about this sentence.

I'll go to the convention center as soon as I've checked into the hotel.

When I first saw this sentence, I felt that as soon as + I've checked into the hotel is a strange combination. As soon as sounds like something will happen, but I've checked into the hotel must be something that has done already. Therefore, I think using a present tense check into looks easier to me, or just like what Aperisic mentioned, using will have checked into the hotel is also an option. Does that make sense to you? Please advise.

LC
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more