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Here is another question. It is on the comparative degree.
This one bothers me a lot.

The Sentence:
1. She has as much experience in teaching as anyone in this school.

Question:
With use of "as much ... as", could sentence 1 above means like 2 below?  In other words, the superlative degree?
2. She has more experiences in teaching than anyone else in this school.

I thought sentence 1 only meant:
3. She is an experienced teacher but no more than anyone else. Thus all teachers are equally experienced in this school.

... I have never heard that sentence 1 could mean the superlative degree but some people so insists. Where does this idea come from?

I do not care what example you may use, but someone please convince me. Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Hi,
Here is another question. It is on the comparative degree.
This one bothers me a lot.

The Sentence:
1. She has as much experience in teaching as anyone in this school.

Question:
With use of "as much ... as", could sentence 1 above means like 2 below?  In other words, the superlative degree? No.If I have $1, and I have as much money as anyone else here, we each have $1.

2. She has more experiences in teaching than anyone else in this school.

I thought sentence 1 only meant:
3. She is an experienced teacher but no more than anyone else. Thus all teachers are equally experienced in this school. A native speaker would take sentence 1 to mean 'No-one has more experience than her'. Sentence #1 would often be said in response to someone saying "She is a very inexperienced teacher'.

... I have never heard that sentence 1 could mean the superlative degree but some people so insists. Where does this idea come from? Lack of understanding of English, I suppose. Is there perhaps some feature in how your native language handles comparisons/superlatives that is causing people to misinterpret like this?

I do not care what example you may use, but someone please convince me.

Best wishes, Clive
Often, we use "as ...as" in arguments in who is better
Joe says to Tom, "I am taller than you."
Tom says, "No you aren't! Stand by me, and not on your toes. See, I am just as tall as you."
Joe says, "Well, I have more toys than you do."
Tom answers, "Wrong again! Count them. I have as many as you."
as...as means the same as, equal to, or of the same degree.
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Clive, AlpheccaStars, thanks:

Clive:
You, however, got me confused on one account. You said:

A
native speaker would take sentence 1 to mean 'No-one has more experience than her'.

Thus:

1. She has as much experience in teaching as anyone in this school.

... means "No-one has more experience than her. Therefore she is the most experienced." ???
Is this not a superlative degree?

Thanks in advance.
No it's not.
The comparative degree is comparison between two. We use "more than" or "adjective +er" to express comparatives. (there are a few exceptions -- good, better, best; bad, worse, worst)

She is taller than I am.
I have more money than she does; I am richer than she is.

The superlative degree is a comparison among more than two. We use "the most + adjective" or "adjective " to express superlatives.
Bill Gates is the richest person in America.
He was voted the most likely to succeed.

In the sentences:
She has as much experience teaching as anyone in this school.
No one here has more experience than she does.

The degree here is not clear. It allows the possibility that everyone has exactly the same experience. The meaning has changed if we say:
She is the most experienced teacher in the school.
Like alpheccastars said, "as much as" can sometimes mean there is also at least one another teacher with the same level of experience.

If you think of it in terms of mathematics, it is more obvious:

teacher > anyone else (greater than) - ...more experienced than anyone...

teacher ≥ anyone else (greater than or equal to) - ...as much experience as anyone else (possibly more than anyone else)...
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alpheccastars
Lakshwadeep

Thanks a million.

I finally got it. You were trying to tell me that it is not the Superlative Degree in which you compose a sentence with "the most (... est) among ...".
The bottom line is the sentence 1 just could mean something similar to superlative from what the it describes.
I was merely trapped by the term the Superlative Degree and was not examining what the sentence actually described.

Guys, thanks again!

J

"as much as" means "the same as others" in your example, and this applies to all other cases when that expression "as much as" is correctly used. The comparative degree would be "she has more experiemce than other" or she's much more experienced than others." The superlative would be" she's the most experienced teacher."
Thanks, I see your point.

J
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