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My grammar book tells that when the word "as" is used as a conjunctive in the concessive clause, the exact following pattern should be followed (no other pattern else):
(1) Young as he is, he has already mastered three foreign languages.
But I also have met the following sentence:
(2) As young as he is, he has already mastered three foreign languages.
My question is whether the pattern involving the word "as" in sentence (2) is also common and acceptable in English. If the answer is yes, then what is the difference between these two patterns in the above two sentences?
Thank you very much!
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To me, it seems quite normal to use "young as he is" to mean "even though he is Emotion: football young" -- i.e. concessive.

To me, the addition of the word "as" to the beginning of that phrase would restrict the meaning to something similar to because/since.

Just my personal two cents.
Emotion: smile
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LiveinseaMy grammar book tells says that when the word "as" is used as a conjunctive in the concessive clause, the exact following pattern should be followed (no other pattern else):
(1) Young as he is, he has already mastered three foreign languages.
But I also have met run across the following sentence:
(2) As young as he is, he has already mastered three foreign languages.
My question is whether the pattern involving the word "as" in sentence (2) is also common and acceptable in English. If the answer is yes, then what is the difference between these two patterns in the above two sentences?Both are common and acceptable. There is no difference in meaning. To my ear, the first sounds a little more refined, so in my opinion, your book is right to encourage its use in preference to the other version.

CJ

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Thank you very much! You are so kind!
Something bothers me about the example - perhaps my lack of exposure.

[As] young as he is, he has already mastered three foreign languages.

I'm used to hearing this introductory phrase leading to a cautionary, not some statement of praise.

Young as he is, he should not be drinking so much.
Young as he is, he hasn't the experience to tackle a job like this.
(Since/because he is so young, he should not be drinkng so much.)

Young though he may be, he has already made his first billion. (This is okay by my ear.)

I'm wondering if the "optional as" makes a difference in this respect.
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Yankeethe addition of the word "as" to the beginning of that phrase would restrict the meaning to something similar to because/since.
Hmm. Interesting. That nuance goes right over my head! I can 'sort of' see it, though.

Emotion: smile
CJ
Thanks, guys!
Liveinsea: Yankee may have hit the nail on the head. One very good grammar book gives these two examples: (1) Young though his is, Mewbanks holds a responsible position. = clause of concession = Though he is young, Mewbanks .... (2) As hot as I am, I think I would rather have the lemonade. = clause of cause and degree.
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