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Please correct my dialogue to make it more natural..

tourist : Good morning I would like to ask about the entrance fees for an adult.How much is the entrance fee for children aged 5, 13 and 16 years ?

Cashier : Good morning, sir. Tickets for an adult is 12 dollars and for children aged between 13 to 16 years is 7dollars. Children who are 5 years old only need to pay 4 dollars

Tourist : Can you tell me the attractions that can be found here? I would also like to know the visiting hours too.

Cashier:: We have a lot of fun activities to join.First we have the water sculpture in the lobby. Then you can enjoy yourself in the dark ride in. You can also see the exhibitions about the energy station and the diorama. After all this you are welcome to buy a souvenir from our shop as a sweet reminder of your trip. We operate from 9.30am to 6.30pm on Saturdays , Sundays and public holidays. On Tuesadys, wednesdays and Thursdays the tim is from 9.30am to 5.30pm. The last admission for these days is one and a half hours before closing time. I hope you are satisfied with the information.

Tourist : Thank you very much. You have been very helpful.

Thanking for your help.
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Hi,

Please correct my dialogue to make it more natural..

tourist : Good morning. I'd like to ask about the adult entry price, please. And how much is it for children?

Cashier : Good morning, sir. Adult tickets are 12 dollars and for children between 13 and 16, it's 7dollars. 4 to 12 pay 6 dollars. 5 year olds only pay 4 dollars. Under 5 is free.

tourist : What can I see here, please?

Cashier:: We have a lot of fun activities. First we have the water sculpture in the lobby. Then you can enjoy yourself on the dark ride in. You can also see the exhibitions about the energy station and the diorama. After all this, we have a souvenir shop.

tourist: Sounds great . What are your hours, please?

cashier: We're open from 9.30am to 6.30pm on Saturdays , Sundays and public holidays. On Tuesadys, Wednesdays and Thursdays it's from 9.30am to 5.30pm. Last admission is one and a half hours before closing time.

Tourist : Thank you very much. You've been very helpful.

Best wishes, Clive
AnonymousPlease correct my dialogue to make it more natural..
I'm going to focus on natural, in the sense of real, in the sense of what is to be expected in the real world.

Tourist: Hello. How much is the entrance fee?
Cashier: $12.
Tourist: Is there a discount for children?
Cashier: Admission is $7 for kids under 16; $4 if they're under 5.
Tourist: And when are you open?
Cashier: The hours are posted at the main entrance, but note that the last admission is one and a half hours before closing.
Tourist: What is there to do here?
Cashier: Here's a brochure that describes the attractions.
Tourist: Thanks.
Cashier: Don't forget to visit the gift shop. Can I help the next person in line?

CJ
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Thanks Clive for helping me many times .
Thanks CalifJim .Both your answer and Clive's are what I need
CJ, I find your cashier to be unfriendly or impatient. Shouldn't cashiers be more friendly, eg cashiers at Universal Studios, Disney World etc? I know they are straight to the point and try to reduce the wait time. Just out of curiosity, what if a foreign tourist says, he can't read English and demand the cashier to tell him about the attractions. Just a short answer will do. I don't want to waste your time since this is not a grammatical question- more about the culture. I don't think the cashier will say "go find someone that knows English" or worse "don't come to an English speaking country if you do not speak the language". Believe me or not, I've heard this. Sad but true. I'm not judging anyone. There are bad apples in any country.
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New2grammarI find your cashier to be unfriendly or impatient
Give yourself a pat on the back for picking up on that!
New2grammarthis is not a grammatical question- more about the culture.
Exactly. It was my purpose to highlight this.
New2grammarShouldn't cashiers be more friendly, eg cashiers at Universal Studios, Disney World etc?
The cashiers at these 'name-brand' attractions are undoubtedly more friendly. But the original post said nothing about this, so I did a dialog more appropriate to some other less-known attraction.
My point is also that cashiers don't normally act as explainers, advertisers, or tour guides. They mostly ask "How many tickets?" and say "That'll be $20". They take money and give out tickets. The original dialog casts the cashier in an unrealistic role, in my opinion. Try striking up a conversation about metro routes with a Parisian metro ticket-seller, and see how far you get! You will undoubtedly be referred to written materials -- if you can even understand anything that's said in all that noise!
Another point I am making is that oral communication is often much less necessary than we realize, especially of the type illustrated in the original dialog presented; so much information is available in written form. The point is that many dialogs for learners are completely unrealistic. They are exercises for using certain sentence structures and certain vocabulary. And everyone in foreign language dialogs is much more polite, civilized, and helpful than real people!
New2grammarwhat if a foreign tourist says, he can't read English and demand the cashier to tell him about the attractions.
"demand" is a strong word. I don't think anyone, native or foreign, will get very far with demands. Consider also that most learners are much more comfortable reading than listening to a foreign language, so I'm not sure how realistic this situation is, featuring as it does a learner who understands spoken English but cannot read it.
CJ
I totally understand your points. If I read this post of yours 10 years ago, I would agree only half of it. Not that I would mean to disagree with you but believe it or not, cultural differences are huge. I'm sure most native speakers are exposed to other cultures, like in the US, Mexicans and Hispanics, Asians (I'm sorry I'm not good with etnics -something I'm still learning) are part of society. However, some smaller cultures in Asia which haven't been globalized or I would say, less competitive in the business world, are much more polite, friendly and helpful. When I was a kid, I remember people were so friendly that a simple question like the one presented by the original poster would receive an overwhelming response. Everyone 'rushed' to help as if they would be tipped when the fact was that they had plenty of free time and wanted to kill time by chatting with anyone and that they felt great to be able to be of any assistance. Today, this is still true though it's slowly fading away partly due to globalization. If you ask me how natural the original poster's dialog is, I would say it depends on which region it takes place. In the US, I'm quite sure it would be briefer as you've pointed out. Speaking from my experience, recently the bus I was on dropped off a family who turned out to be lost tourists. The bus driver spent half an hour trying to help them find their hotel though he had no idea where the hotel was. Silly huh? I was the only passenger onboard pissed with the driver, shame on me being a native.

(Edit: Having said that, the condition is that you need to speak their native language. That's the key to the politeness, friendliness and helpfulness. Otherwise, you will get even briefer version "Yes, light light (for right), Bi Bi (Bye Bye)" because many can't speak English! not because they refuse to help)
some smaller cultures in Asia which haven't been globalized or I would say, less competitive in the business world, are much more polite, friendly and helpful.
I believe it. The same is true in smaller towns in the U.S. As a general rule, the farther you get away from the big cities, the more likely you are to find people who are friendlier and more helpful -- and curious too, of course. I have found the same to be true in Europe as well. Maybe the difference is not so much the culture of one country versus another (though there are differences of course), but the culture of big cities versus less urbanized areas.
CJ
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