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The two examples are seen quite often in literature (especially in technical/medical texts), with the former being more common. Are they strictly equivalent? What subtle nuances distinguish the two? Thanks for your comments.
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" We are entering a new era, when illiterate and educated go hand in hand..."

This idea is really impressive
Associated to, tends to be British.
Associated with, more American.
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As you are a writer and editor involved with English as a second language (ESL), you would be a perfect authority on questions like this. Do you happen to know of any website that deal exclusively with ESL usage like this? Native English speakers take this kind of nuances for granted but it really baffles non-native English speakers. If there is no such a website, maybe someone ought to create one.
"nuance" means "difference", just so you know Emotion: smile
Yes, I confirm that some, if not most, native French speakers say "associate to" instead of "associate with". They basically just translate the French "associer à" (where "à" is literally translated to "to").

I had to correct today "associated to" within a text handled by native French speakers. I just wanted to give a sort of explanation why it had to be replaced by "associated with" through a URL link, and I stumbled on this page Emotion: smile
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'Associate with ' is right.
AnonymousThe two examples are seen quite often in literature (especially in technical/medical texts), with the former being more common. Are they strictly equivalent? What subtle nuances distinguish the two? Thanks for your comments.
you might add native Italian speakers to French - the source of the error seems to be that we would say "associato a qualche cosa" (that translates word-by-word as: "associated to something") rather than "associato con qualche cosa" ("associated with something").
Shoulds, shouldn'ts, why's and why nots are rather moot in discussions about grammar and usage. We don't say "associated to," and all the shoulds, woulds and coulds in the world don''t change that fact. We don't say "earth apple" either; no slight to anyone and certainly no cause to take offense just because we in fact say "potato".
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wrong. "nuance" means "subtle qualification" "non-black-vs-white argument"
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