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The two examples are seen quite often in literature (especially in technical/medical texts), with the former being more common. Are they strictly equivalent? What subtle nuances distinguish the two? Thanks for your comments.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
In spanish you can say either with (con) or to (a) depending on what is meant.

If someone is associated with someone else, this is to form a new entity, an association, like a business partnership.
The same person can become associated to a sports club, or to a political party, etc. as a member. There is not partnership in this case, so WITH cannot be used in ths case in Spanish.

In academics,you can say (in spanish) that a bacterium is associated to a certain syndrom. This bacterium is part of the explanation, and other entities might take part as well. In this case, a certain bacterium can be associated WITH other bacterium to cause a syndrom.

Then there are other cases when associated with or to can be exchanged. Napoleon was associated with the trade of slaves, or Napoleon was associated to the trade of slaves. Actually, the latter seems more correct in spanish.

Doesnt it work like this in English ?
"other langages having influence on English" shouldn't mean "poor English having influence on English"! Italian or French actually are langages. They do no compare to a lack of grammar.
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AnonymousToday, when most articles in science and learning are required in English, and when every one can use his/her personal computer to type-in (and so many illiterate editoring staff around...), mistakes of every sort galore!
According to the M-W and the OED, "galore" is not a verb. Possibly this oversight is not due to illiteracy.
Many people make errors in English and some
Anonymous AnonymousToday, when most articles in science and learning are required in English, and when every one can use his/her personal computer to type-in (and so many illiterate editoring staff around...), mistakes of every sort galore!According to the M-W and the OED, "galore" is not a verb. Possibly this oversight is not due to illiteracy.
people have made errors in the English comments posted on this page. However "galore" is not used as a verb here but as an adjective qualifying the plural noun "mistakes" (while "of every sort" is an adjectival phrase qualifying the same noun).

I would like to thank the previous contributors for enlightening me as to why I find the phrase "associates to" sounds such a wrong note in English.
I am British and would never say "associated to".
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I am thinking that there might actually be two different meanings:

To associate with - to associate something with something else, mostly in one's mind.
"I associate angels to Christianity."

but

To associate to - to be in or to create an association, to join two things together (syn.: to pair).
"In his endeavor, the man was associated to a legal counselor."
Not 'associate to'.

eg I associate angels with Christianity.

Clive
Right, the example should of course have been: "I associate angels with Christianity."
Thank you Clive.
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I have not see this documented formally anywhere but perhaps we "associate to a thing" and we "associate with a person"
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