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This bottle [assumes the shape of a cock/has the shape of a c ock/is shaped into a c ock]

I believe there are differences.

The first sounds like the bottle transforms into a c ock in front of you.

The last sounds like the bottle is currently being molded into the shape.

So,I think only the second "has" is correct.

What do you think?
Thanks.
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Comments  
New2grammarWhat do you think?
You are going to have to change your example. There a millions of things in the world that you could have used to illustrate the shapes of bottles. There's no reason you had to choose that word. Are you trying to be provocative?
Please change the example at once! [6]

CJ
I had used bear so I didn't want to repeat it. The next thing that came to my mind was that. After posting it, I realized it had another meaning which I didn't think it was really provocative as long as readers don't think that way. Anyway, here's another animal. Now come to think of it, I rarely hear that word used by native speakers to mean what it's supposed to. It's quite common in my language though.

This bottle [assumes the shape of a fish/has the shape of a fish/is shaped into a fish]

I believe there are differences.

The first sounds like the bottle transforms into a fish in front of you.

The last sounds like the bottle is currently being molded into the shape.

So,I think only the second "has" is correct.
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New2grammarI rarely hear that word used by native speakers to mean what it's supposed to.
You have to use 'rooster' for that meaning. The other word has now become almost exclusively used for the male sex organ -- though there may be some remnants of the original meaning in older writings.
My response was partially pretense, by the way, to give you an indication of what a strong negative impression you would be greeted by if you actually used that word in 'polite society'. Someone would surely take you aside and explain privately that that word is "just not used".
CJ
New2grammarThe first sounds like the bottle transforms into a fish in front of you.
Yes.
New2grammarI think only the second "has" is correct.
Yes, but ... the third would do, though not as good. I like this pattern better:
The bottle is shaped like a fish.
New2grammarThe last sounds like the bottle is currently being molded into the shape.
Yes, or is regularly molded into that shape, as part of a manufacturing process. "currently being molded" would more likely be expressed with the progressive: This bottle is being shaped into a fish.
Still, as mentioned above, the third one can be considered as a "stative": The bottle is shaped ... can mean that the bottle simply has that shape. Nevertheless, as mentioned above, there are better ways of saying it.
CJ
AHA. I know that word but for some reason, the c word pops into my mind faster than the R word. Thanks for the warning. It will save me some embarrassment.
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CalifJimThe bottle is shaped like a fish.
Got it! Thanks. If "the shape of a fish" is used, is HAS the only choice of verb?
Hmmm.
The bottle _____ the shape of a fish.
Hmmm. There are other verbs that can go there, but not with the meaning of has.
resembles and suggests are possible, for example, but I don't think that's what you're looking for.
CJ
Got it. I'll use your suggestion, that is, The bottle is shaped like a fish.
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