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Hello everybody.

I know nothing about baseball and I am reading a text including an example from baseball. I refer to different sites to get some information but my mother tongue is Persian and I failed to figure them out. Would you please help me to get the following?

Larrick also noted that it’s easier to divide bigger numbers by smaller numbers, which also might explain statistics like “at bats per strikeout” (or AB per SO). As with miles per gallon, the AB per SO metric also exaggerates differences: a player with a 2 percent chance of striking out each time he’s at bat has an AB per SO of 50, while another with a slightly higher 3 percent chance of striking out each time has an AB per SO of 33.

At bat means ready to get the ball, am I right?

Strikeout means the wrong hit, is that right?

Thanks 😊


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Here's a quick explanation that should be enough for you to get the point.

at bat means the player gets a chance to hit the balls pitched to him (thrown to him). (A player may stand at bat quite a few times during one game, and a great number of times during his whole career as a baseball player.)

strikeout means the player has failed while at bat. (This is the simplest explanation without going into the details of what counts a strike or the number of strikes that count as a failure.)

So at bats per strikeout is like tries per failures, i.e., the number of times at bat (tries) divided by the number of strikeouts (failures).

If tries is 100 and failures is 2 (making successes 98), then at bats per strikeouts is 100 / 2 = 50. 2 failures in 100 tries is 2% failures.

If tries is 100 and failures is 3 (making successes 97), then at bats per strikeouts is 100 / 3 ~ 33. 3 failures in 100 tries is 3% failures.

And so on.

CJ

Comments  
Jamal 1315At bat means ready to get the ball, am I right?

There are two teams. They take turns playing offense and defense. The team on offense sits in the dugout and sends men to the plate one at a time with a bat to hit the ball with. That player is said to be up or at bat. He either gets on base, scores a run, or is out. Whichever of those three occurs, that was his at bat.

Jamal 1315Strikeout means the wrong hit, is that right?

When a batter is up, he stands next to home plate, which is a hard rubber plate on the ground in the shape of an irregular pentagon. The other team's pitcher throws the ball to his catcher behind home plate, and the batter can try to hit the ball with his bat. If the catcher catches the ball, he throws it back to the pitcher. This happens over and over until either the batter gets on base, in one of many ways, scores, or the batter is out, also in many ways.

One way the batter can be out is on strikes. When the pitcher throws a pitch, and it passes over home plate at a height between the batter's knees and roughly the level of his xiphoid process, and the batter does not make contact with the ball with his bat, that is a strike, a called strike, so called because the plate umpire has to declare it vocally. If the batter hits the ball foul (out of bounds) in the air, and no one catches it, that is a strike also the first two times he does it during that at bat. Subsequent foul balls have no effect. When a batter reaches three strikes in an at bat, he has struck out. His at bat is over, and the pitcher has made a strikeout.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJimIf tries is 100 and failures is 2 (making successes 98), then at bats per strikeouts is 100 / 2 = 50. 2 failures in 100 tries is 2% failures.If tries is 100 and failures is 3 (making successes 97), then at bats per strikeouts is 100 / 3 ~ 33. 3 failures in 100 tries is 3% failures.

Does it mean that that mathematical equation states the number of tries per one failure?

anonymousDoes it mean that that mathematical equation states the number of tries per one failure?

Yes. It's the basic rule for all measurements of the form

{number} Xs per Y.

25 miles per gallon; 60 miles per hour; 180 feet per second; 300 calories per teaspoon; $25 per hour; 2410 cubic feet per second; $400 per ounce

If the measurement is not of this type, it will include a number on the second part to explain it, thus:

10 grams per 100 pounds of body weight
35 crimes per 10,000 people in that area
only once per 60 seconds

CJ

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