Salute to a technical term that covers just the required scope of meaning, no more and no less.
First of all, it's gloriously searchable (a key requirement until online search works by mind-reading); it's a term both concise and precise describing an everyday condition.
I've no idea what the BrE equivalent is, and suspect it would take an age to track it down by search.
(For the railway/road equivalent, 'level crossing' (AmE 'grade crossing') is the popular BrE expression. Perhaps the lack of a similar expression for one road crossing another comes from the relative lack of limited-access highways in the UK: the default felt not to demand a special term, perhaps.)
If the word was French or Spanish, say, one could dash to one's bilingual illustrated Duden for a translation from looking at the pictures without the need to know the English equivalent. (Indeed, I wouldn't not know the corresponding English term for the vast majority of items for which equivalents are given.)
There is some case, certainly, for a BrE-AmE Duden!
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If the word was French or Spanish, say, one could dash to one's bilingual illustrated Duden for a translation from looking at the pictures without the need to know the English equivalent. (Indeed, I wouldn't not know the corresponding English term for the vast majority of items for which equivalents are given.)

There is some case, certainly, for a BrE-AmE Duden!
I note with interest that this still makes some sense if we take Duden to be the inclusive form(1) of "dudes and dudettes".

(1) Inclusive form of? Term that generalizes? ...?

Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
Salute to a technical term that covers just the required scope of meaning, no more and no less. First of ... for the vast majority of items for which equivalents are given.) There is some case, certainly, for a BrE-AmE Duden!

So: what the heck is a "grade intersection", then?!

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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(For the railway/road equivalent, 'level crossing' (AmE 'grade crossing') is the popular BrE expression. Perhaps the lack of a similar ... comes from the relative lack of limited-access highways in the UK: the defaultfelt not to demand a special term, perhaps.)

Say what? Check out the AA website, paying particular attention to the blue ribbony things. And where they cross is called an "interchange"; junctions with A and minor roads are called, startlingly perhaps, "junctions".

Mike.
Salute to a technical term that covers just the required scope of meaning, no more and no less. First of ... no idea what the BrE equivalent is, and suspect it would take an age to track it down by search.

Try Googling "at-grade junction", and its friend "grade-separated junction".

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
So: what the heck is a "grade intersection", then?!

A sudden decline in quality, often repeated, as evidenced in communications from the bottomless pit.
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Salute to a technical term that covers just the required scope of meaning, no more and no less. First of ... for the vast majority of items for which equivalents are given.) There is some case, certainly, for a BrE-AmE Duden!

I read your post twice, and couldn't work out what you were talking about.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Salute to a technical term that covers just the required ... given.) There is some case, certainly, for a BrE-AmE Duden!

I read your post twice, and couldn't work out what you were talking about.

He's made the error of putting the subject in the Subject line and not in the body of the message. And there's a missing hyphen as well(1). From :

At-Grade Intersection
An intersection where all roadways join or cross at the same level.

Grade-Separated Intersection
A crossing of two highways or other transportation facilities, at different levels.
For the UK, change "intersection" to "junction". But the average Brit (not an engineer) would be probably unfamiliar with the terms.
(1) I never feel entirely happy about "there's a missing..."

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
(-)
Grade-Separated Intersection A crossing of two highways or other transportation facilities, at different levels. For the UK, change "intersection" to "junction". But the average Brit (not an engineer) would be probably unfamiliar with the terms.

Does that mean that the English technical (or any) definition of the point at which a road crosses a canal, or a railway bridges either is a
"Grade-Separated Junction"?
Without the temerity to suggest anything different, I find that "Grade" a bit counter-productive. Would not "Level" be better in England?
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