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(1) I saw him at a distance.

(2) I saw him at a great distance.

(3) I saw him at a considerable distance.

(4) I saw him from a distance.

(5) I saw him from a great distance.

(6) I saw him from a considerable distance.

Which is correct?

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They're all OK.

"at ... distance" ~ He was located far away from me.
"from ... distance" ~ I was located far away from him.

It's really the same thing, but just with a slightly different emphasis.

CJ

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CalifJim

They're all OK.

"at ... distance" ~ He was located far away from me.
"from ... distance" ~ I was located far away from him.

It's really the same thing, but just with a slightly different emphasis.

CJ

Thanks.

Which sounds idiomatic in spoken English?

Going by what I hear and say most often here in California, I'd say the versions with "from" are more usual and natural.

CJ

Thanks a lot, CalifJim.

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Does the following sentence sound idiomatic to you?

I saw him in the distance.

Photon

Does the following sentence sound idiomatic to you?

I saw him in the distance.

Yes. That's fine, but you can't add 'great' or 'considerable' to this idiom.

For this one you have the variants "in the far distance" (very far) and "in the middle distance" (about half way between you and some very distant reference point).

CJ

Many thanks, CalifJim.

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