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You will never be at/in peace until you have discovered where your father is.

John died in/at peace.

Should I use in or at peace in the above samples and why? What are the differences between the two phrases? Thanks.
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I would use "at peace" in both of your examples. I think "at peace" is more of a state of mind, while "in peace" suggest that no external force is disturbing you.

We hope that countries might co-exist in peace instead of in conflict.

"Rest in Peace" is often written on gravestones -- once a person dies, nothing can ever disturb him again.
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KhoffI would use "at peace" in both of your examples. I think "at peace" is more of a state of mind, while "in peace" suggest that no external force is disturbing you.

We hope that countries might co-exist in peace instead of in conflict.

"Rest in Peace" is often written on gravestones -- once a person dies, nothing can ever disturb him again.

Thanks, Khoff.

I got it.

But in the second sample, the original uses "in peace." Do you think it makes good sense? Are there any differences in meaning between the two different versions?
If I read "John died at peace" I would think that his mind was at ease, he was not troubled by guilt or remorse or anything like that. If I read "John died in peace" I would think that he had a peaceful death -- perhaps at home in bed asleep, rather than in an emergency room with doctors pounding on his chest and sticking tubes down his throat.

Other people's interpretations may vary, though. Some might say there's not a significant difference.
Thanks, Khoff.

Got it.
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