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Hi, I would like to know what´s the difference between "in the end" and "at the end"

in the end - end of something immaterial e.g. movie

at the end - end of something material e.g, street

Is that correct? Thanks.
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Hi Emily

Some examples:
He became happy in the end.
In the end everything turned out right.
= finally, eventually, after all

At the end is usually used with of:
There is a church at the end of the street.
Everyone stood up at the end of the lecture.

Cheers
CB
Also, we can say,

In the end, it is parents' responsibility, is the moral upbringing of a child.= All things being equal, it is parents' responsibility, is the moral upbringing of a child. = When all things being considered, it is parents' responsibility, is the moral upbringing of a child.

My question: do we space out sentences in formal register like I did?

Is it acceptable in formal texts to give the reader time for him to process the information by slowing down the pace of the text this way?
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Incho:

>My question: do we space out sentences in formal register like I did?

Which spacing out are you talking about?

BTW, When all things being considered isn't idiomatic, IMO.
Hi Marius

We can space out different elements of a sentence by adding a so-called tag, giving the hearer some time to interpret what has been said before going on to the following piece of info.

You are very smart, you are, because you learn a lot. I spaced out this sentence (you are) to allow the hearer time to take in the info I have just said. Is it allowed in formal register?

and

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=82540&dict=CALD
Marius HancuBTW, When all things being considered isn't idiomatic, IMO.
I reckon Marius is right. Well, I do hear it now and then but the correct idiomatic form is "all things considered."
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The use of techniques for "spacing out" the elements of a sentence is not, in my opinion, restricted to any particular register. I find it in both formal and informal texts. The specific words, of course, will indicate register to some extent, but the general technique in itself will not. That a writer may express himself in an expansive way or in a condensed way is more of a characteristic of style than an indicator of register. At least, that's my story -- and I'm sticking to it. Emotion: big smile

CJ
Inchoateknowledge
That page does not show:
*When all things being considered (which I don't consider correct)
it's just a reference to:
all things considered

They're not the same in terms of idiomatic usage.
Inchoateknowledge In the end, it is parents' responsibility, is the moral upbringing of a child.
I hear this is in (informal, verbal) commentating in tennis (Pat McEnroe likes it). I don't think it's correct in formal writing, never saw it.

Other than that, playing with the syntax is allowed the way you do it in the above, but I don't think it necessarily helps the clarity. I'd still prefer:

The moral upbringing of a child is ...

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