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Hi guys, I'm Chris and I have an exam in English soon - and I've got a problem with a couple of questions.

Would you rather say:

Please hand in your essays on next Monday the latest

Please hand in your essays by next Monday at the latest

Please hand in your essays until next Monday in the latest

Rooms should be vacated by midday at the latest
Rooms should be vacated until midday at last

Rooms should be vacated at midday in the last

Also, would you say there are many countries at the Equator, on the Equator or in the Equator?

I'd be really grateful if you also provided en explanation. Thanks a lot.
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AnonymousPlease hand in your essays on next Monday at the latest

Please hand in your essays by next Monday at the latest This one is very common. People also use the first one, but they really mean this one.

Please hand in your essays until next Monday in the latest. We sometimes say, "You may hand in your essays any time up until next Monday."

Rooms should be vacated by midday at the latest Okay. (These all need periods.)

Rooms should be vacated until midday at last. It would be possible to say, "Rooms should not be vacated until midday on Monday."

Rooms should be vacated at midday in the last

Also, would you say there are many countries at the Equator, on the Equator or in the Equator?

"On the Equator" is usually taken to mean that the Equator passes through the country. "At the Equator" may mean that also, but it usually provides a bit of leeway. You could also say "in the vacinity of the Equator."

AvangiPlease hand in your essays on next Monday at the latest

Please hand in your essays by next Monday at the latest This one is very common. People also use the first one, but they really mean this one.
1. Please hand in your essays on next Monday at the latest. -- I think this sentence is 'correct', but I prefer "Please hand in your essays by next Monday. (I don't see the need for "at the latest").

2. Please hand in your essays by next Monday at the latest. -- This sentence doesn't appear quite right to me because by next Monday implies that next Monday is the deadline, so, to me, 'at the latest' is redundant.

Am I on the right track? Emotion: thinking
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Yoong Liat 'at the latest' is redundant.

Am I on the right track? Absolutely!

I think this is just a conversational device, in which redundancy is used for emphasis, to make an impression on students who may be daydreaming about happier times.Emotion: love

AvangiI think this is just a conversational device, in which redundancy is used for emphasis, to make an impression on students who may be daydreaming about happier times.
I agree with you. No more .
I see nothing wrong with saying "by Monday at the latest".

It could be earlier than Monday, say, the Friday before. However, no later than Monday.

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Hi, Goodman. "Hand in your papers by Monday" would admit their being handed in earlier.
"Hand in your papers on Monday" would not.
"Hand in your papers on Monday at the latest" is the one that grates a little bit. I suspect "at the latest" in this sentence is adverbial, while in "Hand in your papers by Monday at the latest," it's adjectival.

(That oughta stir up some controversy!) Emotion: big smile Rgdz, A.
Hi Avangi,

"please hand in your paper on / by Monday" The underlined is Preposition phrase which is adverbial in nature.

"Hand in your papers by Monday at the latest" I would call this " complex prep phrase if you will. If this is a valid classification, then the whole underlined phrase is adverbial.

This theroy can be a can of worm...Emotion: stick out tongue
I agree. But I think it's a little bit sneaky to avoid saying what something is, by simply calling it part of a complex structure. Emotion: geeked

Rgdz, - A.
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