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In the southern part of the U.S., an old tradition is to eat black at New Year's. Some people eat one pea for each day of the coming year. People say that the peas can bring good luck and prosperity.

Is there a word omitted after "at New Year's?" Is it "Time" or "Eve" in the above sample? Thanks.
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There are two words omitted after 'black'-- it should read 'eat black-eyed peas'. New Year's is a common way to refer to New Year's Day, but it can also refer to the general season, i.e. New Year's Eve and Day and a few days afterwards.
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AnonymousThere is a word omitted so unless you speak American English in particular, it is incorrect.
Well, as rather more people speak AmE than BrE, I think it might be better to say that it is incorrect in BrE.
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Thanks, Mister.

Got it.
In American English, it seems not. There is a word omitted so unless you speak American English in particular, it is incorrect. The words "New Year's" are not used in the English of England, without at least one other word after them. The correct wording in the UK is New Year, unless someone is talking about New Year's eve or New Year's day.
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 fivejedjon's reply was promoted to an answer.