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She found herself out in the street again at the place from which she had started.

About 'at the place', is it a modifier of 'the street'? Or is it something else?
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She found herself out in the street again at the place from which she had started.

I think both prepositional phrases are adverbial, modifying the verb "found."

You could reverse the order, or use only one, or the other.

(She found herself where?)

out in the street again

at the place from which she had started

Your analysis is possible, though.
The first one could modify "place," or the second one could modify "street."

(I'd get more opinions.)

Put your clothes where they belong, in the closet.
Put your clothes in the closet, where they belong.
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So 'the street at the place' itself makes sense, Avangi?
She found herself out in the street again at the place from which she had started.

Hi, Taka,

If you're asking if the "again" may be deleted from your original sentence, I would say, "yes."

I suppose it could be argued that doing so makes the first phrase less independent, and more dependent on the second phrase.

When you say, "again," you imply prior context, which would flesh out the meaning of "out in the street."

Without it, we look to the second phrase for elaboration.
OK. Thanks, Avangi!
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