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What is a car but a modern version of a magic carpet, ready to take its passengers wherever they command at the turn of a key?

Which does 'at the turn of a key' refer to; '(to) take its passengers' or 'they command'?
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Hmm. I wonder whether we could read it as an adverbial modifying "ready":

"...ready, at the turn of a key, to take..."

I suppose the phrase is intended to recall typical "Arabian Nights" phrases such as "in the twinkling of an eye", etc.

MrP
Comments  
Hi Taka,

I'd say '.. take its passengers'. Consider a slightly reworded sentence:

What is a car but a modern version of a magic carpet, ready to take its passengers to Tokyo at the turn of a key?

Clive

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Thank you, Clive!
Isn't a comma missing after they command ?
No. There is no comma there in the original text.
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 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.