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1. She walks as though she is drunk.

2. She walks as though she was drunk.

3. She walks as though she were drunk.

What is the difference between the three sentences? I believe #2 and #3 have the same meaning.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Marius HancuAt the New York Times:

http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?query=%22as+though+she+were%22+&srchst=nyt
"as though she were" 185 Results

http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?query=%22as+though+she+is%22+&srchst=nyt
"as though she is" 28 Results
Marius, you would make a perfect descriptive grammarian.
No, I prefer prescriptivism, but I must live in this worldEmotion: smile
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needs must?
I remember reading in one of my books on English usage many, many years ago that there is a difference between He walks as though he were drunk and He walks as though he is drunk. But I wasn't sure that my memory served me right.

After posting, the more I thought, the more I felt I must continue to look for the book, which I had been searching for many days, and I finally found it.

According to 'Current English Usage' written by Frederick T. Wood, and published by Macmillan Publishers Limited (London), there is a difference between the sentences.

It states that where they express an imaginary case, 'as if' and 'as though' must be followed by a subjunctive, not by an indicative verb. There is a distinction between 'He walks as though he were drunk' (implying 'but his is not'), and 'He walks as though he is drunk, (meaning 'He is drunk judging from the way he walks').
Yoong LiatI remember reading in one of my books on English usage many, many years ago that there is a difference between He walks as though he were drunk and He walks as though he is drunk. But I wasn't sure that my memory served me right.

After posting, the more I thought, the more I felt I must continue to look for the book, which I had been searching for many days, and I finally found it.

According to 'Current English Usage' written by Frederick T. Wood, and published by Macmillan Publishers Limited (London), there is a difference between the sentences.

It states that where they express an imaginary case, 'as if' and 'as though' must be followed by a subjunctive, not by an indicative verb. There is a distinction between 'He walks as though he were drunk' (implying 'but his is not'), and 'He walks as though he is drunk, (meaning 'He is drunk judging from the way he walks').

So my version is supported here. The author is a staunch supporter of the dying subjuctive. Indicative is ok, too.
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Incho

Your answers tally with what's stated in the book. Perfect score!
Yoong Liat
Inchoateknowledge
Yoong Liat
Incho

What about sentence 1?

Read my post again. It must have slipped your attention.
Sorry. I was distracted by the other sentences and missed this: "1 means that the speaker assumes she is drunk."

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Marius HancuSee the real and unreal stuff here:

http://www.englishpage.com/conditional/conditionalintro.html

Could you please produce the relevant part rather than give us the website?
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