+0
Hi, I want to ask you about the use of conjunctive adverbs like "for example", "namely", "in addition", "finally".

I think the first two can function in a distinctively different way than most of other conjunctive adverbs, including "in addition."

Normally, I I think an adverb can either work itself within a sentence or function as a connector of two independent clauses like this.

He will deliver pizza; in addition, he will help customers park their cars.
In addition to what he said he will do, he is proposing to do more.
He finally went home.

But, "for example" and "namely" seem to function differently than most other conjunctive adverbs at least in this form.

He will do a lot things after school, for example deliver pizza, run errands, etc.
He will do a few things for us today, namely deliver pizza and run errands.

I don't see most of other adverbs can be part of this kind of sentence structures but how come these two can?
+0
Anon:
For most words or phrases in English, the part of speech that they have is dependent on how they used in specific sentences. Just giving a word out of its context may not be enough.
He finally went home. (finally is an adverb)
He waited and waited and waited, finally, he gave up and went home. (coordinating conjunction)
In addition to what he said he will do, he is proposing to do more. ( 'in addition to' is a subordinating conjunction; the first clause is a dependent clause)
There are hundreds of transition words and phrases like these.
They can be used in the following ways: to join independent clauses (semicolon used after the first clause), to begin a new sentence, to introduce dependent clauses, or to introduce a list of words or phrases, specifically: namely, for example, specifically, in particular, for instance, by illustration, as follows, e.g., and such as.
+0
Hi,
I'd say ' . . . and finally . . .'

Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  
Thank you, AlpheccaStars.

I don't think the word "finally" can act as a coodinating conjunction as you showed here.

He waited and waited and waited, finally, he gave up and went home. (coordinating conjunction)

If I am wrong, can you tell me more about this function of the word "finally" or some words that can perform similar functions?
Sorry, I meant a "conjunctive adverb" - this on-line writing guide explains the different types of conjunctions a lot better than I can!
http://www.rscc.cc.tn.us/owl&writingcenter/OWL/Connect.html
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you, again, and my thanks goes to Clive, too.

You wrote:

They can be used in the following ways: to join independent clauses (semicolon used after the first clause), to begin a new sentence, to introduce dependent clauses, or to introduce a list of words or phrases, specifically: namely, for example, specifically, in particular, for instance, by illustration, as follows, e.g., and such as.

In the above, for the things you said about the function of a conjunctive adverb to introduce a list of words or phrases. I think that is limited to certain conjunctive adverbs like the ones you gave, "namely", "for example", "specifically", "in particular", "for instance", "by illustration", "as follows", e.g., and "such as". I think that is all and no other conjunctive adverbs can list words or phrases eventhough the number of them is great. Do you agree? Or please confirm what I said.