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Emotion: winkWhat are the differences between Australian, British and American pronunciation?

I am particularly interested in the Australian one.

Thank you beforehand.Emotion: stick out tongue
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Comments  
That's a very wide question I'm afraid. I'm not sure we could sum it up very clearly for you here - especially as there aren't single Australian, American or British accents.
Hi,
I'm going to tell you the most noticeable differences I notice between British English (the only variety of BrE I know), and American English (the variety of AmE I hear most often).

CAR ------ American R's are always pronounced, British R's are not.
NO -------- British is /əʊ/, American is /oʊ/
NOT ------ British is /ɒ/, American is /ɑ/
NOT ------ British final T's are released, American final T's are not.
LAW ----- In BrE it's /o/, in AmE it's either /ɒ/ or /ɑ/
CLASS --- Some vowels that are /ɑ/ in BrE, in AmE are /æ/
BETTY --- In BrE there are no tapped T's, in AmE there are.
NOW ----- In BrE it's more like /ɑʊ/, in AmE it's more like /æʊ/

Those are the differences I notice. There are a lot of regional variations of course. It would be interesting to know if some American features are present regionally in some other places (for example tapped T's, unreleased final T's, etc.) Emotion: smile
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Emotion: smileOK,

let's put it this way///

how does the Australian pronunciation sound like, the traditional one, if there is one, or probably the most common one?While I know something about the American and British pronunciation, the Australian one is a mystery for meEmotion: sad

Anyone from Australia?How do u sound like?Emotion: embarrassed

Thank you beforehand.
Yes, I don't know much about Australian English either.
I just know it is similar to British English, and they when they say "Kate", it sounds like "kite". But I think there are some British accents with that feature too.
And another variety I know very little about is Jamaican English. I just know that "how" sounds like "hoe", if I'm not mistaken. Emotion: smile
There are lots of Australian TV programmes and soap operas. It's probably easiest if you watch one to get an idea of the accent.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
For more information on Australian English, you can also have a look at this interesting Wikipedia entry:

Here are my comments. The parentheses indicate that something is not part of General American-like dialects or RP, but is found in certain regional dialects..
CAR
------ American R's are always pronounced, British R's are not.
In General American vs. RP, yes, (but there are non-rhotic American dialects on the East coast, and rhotic British dialects.)
NO -------- British is /əʊ/, American is /oʊ/
Some British dialects have /o/. Some American dialects have /o/. (Some American dialects have /əʊ/.)
NOT ------ British is /ɒ/, American is /ɑ/
Actually in about 40% of the country "not" can have /ɒ/ or /ɑ/ used interchangeably.
NOT ------ British final T's are released, American final T's are not.
yeah
LAW ----- In BrE it's /o/, in AmE it's either /ɒ/ or /ɑ/
Actually I belive RP has /O:/ rather than /o/. (In the Boston Brahmin accent it can also be /O:/)
CLASS --- Some vowels that are /ɑ/ in BrE, in AmE are /æ/
Some people in the West can shift /æ/ to /a/. (Some dialects in Boston have a similar trap-bath split.)
BETTY --- In BrE there are no tapped T's, in AmE there are.
From what I've heard, occasionally BrE speakers use tapped t's.
NOW ----- In BrE it's more like /ɑʊ/, in AmE it's more like /æʊ/
Actually General American has /aʊ/. Some regional dialects have /æʊ/.
generally the pronunciation is sort of british in a way.

just a few things i´d like to mention:

1. you won´t hear much of an "r" ( in the middle or end of a word). "air", e.g. there is no "r" the way aussies say it.

2. very strong "ai", like in they, sake, make, ... even: smoke, cake ("smaik" on the water Emotion: smile)

3. strong "oi" in many words like: "I", like, fight, night...

4. very sublte and soft endigs for words like: tomorrow, know, no (hard to copy for foreigners...)

I just love their english Emotion: smile. actually among women you won´t hear it so obvious than among the male set. Emotion: wink for the "westies" among them no. 1-3 is really strong.
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