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This map provides average distances between major US cities, for example, L.A. to Seattle is X miles, L.A. to N.Y.C. is Y miles and N.Y.C to Chicago is Z miles.

Is 'average distances' used correctly in the sentence above or it should be 'average distance'? I believe it is correct because there are multiple distances but I would like a second opinion.
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In this context, "distance" is used as a collective noun between all cities. So "distances" to me is not necessary, perhaps, even incorrect.
This map provides average distances between major US cities, for example, the average distance from L.A. to Seattle is X miles, the average distance L.A. to N.Y.C. is Y miles and the average distance N.Y.C to Chicago is Z miles.

Sorry, my original sentence has a mistake. In this corrected version, is it correct to use 'average distances'?
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Hi guys,

I don't understand what 'average' means here.

What does it mean to say that 'the average distance from L.A. to Seattle is X miles'? Does it mean that the distance changes - on Monday it's 500 miles, and on Tuesday it's 600 miles?

Or that it's 1,000 miles if you go via Vancouver and 7,000 miles if you go via New York, so the average is 4,000 miles?

Please explain. Emotion: smile

What I usually see is 'average driving time'.

Best wishes, Clive
Sorry for not providing a proper context. Basically, an average distance means the average of distances of all possible routes from A to B. For example, to get to B from A, there are three different routes to choose from, so the average distance is the average distance of these 3 routes.

I think my original example does not make sense in daily life unless it is used in the context of GPS or some applications that are interested in measuring average distance. So, does it make any sense to use 'average distances' in the GPS context ?
Hi,

So, does it make any sense to use 'average distances' in the GPS context ?

There would only be one average distance between two places, but a list of such distances could certainly be termed 'a list of average distances'. So, yes, it's fine.

Best wishes, Clive.
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What a relief! Emotion: smile Thank you!
Let's try something that makes more sense.

The grocery store sells five-pound bags of potatoes. Some may weigh 4.85 pounds, some may weight 5.11 pounds, but the average weight (singular) for a bag of potatoes is five pounds. But, if you have a table listing the average weight for the potatores, the carrots, the onions, etc., then the table shows the average weights for these bags of various types of produce.

I know, this just supports the information you've already gotten, but the "averages distances" really had some logic issues to overcome, as discussed.
I agree with you that my example is a confusing one. Your example definitely makes more sense. Thanks, GG.
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