+0

Why is "away" in the first sentence correct but not in the second?

1- She doesn't like being away.

2- I can see the target away.

+2

"She doesn't like being away" is grammatically analogous to e.g. "She doesn't like being cold", "She doesn't like being poor" etc., which I expect are familiar to you. The pattern "I can see + noun + adj." does not work in general cases. It may be possible in certain special cases, but not in (2). (2) may have marginal interpretations, but essentially you can consider it not natural.

+1
Tara2- She doesn't like being away.

Also, She doesn't like to be away.

'to be away' is rather elliptical. It suggests "to be away from home", "to be away from the office", or any similar idea of being absent from a place, where you have to supply the missing place according to context.


Dixon will be away from Chronicle Towers on business for a few weeks.

OR

Dixon is one of the newspaper editors who works at Chronicle Towers. (context established)
He will be away on business for a few weeks. (From the given context, we know that away = away from Chronicle Towers)

Tara22- I can see the target away.

Emotion: tongue tied I can't assign any meaning to this. It's like

I can see the target absent. / I can see the target not there.

CJ

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Thanks a lot GPY!!!

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thank you so much CJ!!!

Does "far away" mean distances of tens of meters, hundreds of meters, or even kilometers, and you don't use it for small distances ? for example is "far away" here odd for you :

I threw the box far away.


I read those in here:

https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/i-threw-the-box-really-far-far-away.3594609/

Tara2Does "far away" mean distances of tens of meters, hundreds of meters, or even kilometers

Words like far always depend on context. Doesn't it work like that in your language? Or do you have lots of different words for far? One word for about a meter, another one for tens of meters, another for hundreds of meters, and so on? I doubt it.

Tara2you don't use it for small distances ?

There are very few contexts in which a few centimeters would be considered far, but that is still possible supposing you're talking about how far an ant has to go to find food or something like that.

Tara2

is "far away" here odd for you :

I threw the box far away.

Yes, that seems a little odd. It's not wrong, and I'm sure you can find examples of "threw it far away" in books, but it doesn't sound natural to me as an isolated sentence. It seems to me that someone would be more specific and more descriptive.

I threw the box across the room.
I threw the box into the rubbish bin.
I threw the box through the window.

And so on.

CJ

Yes I understand that it depends on context.

Thank you so much!!!

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Sorry CJ, what do these two sentences mean for you, please?

1- The school is a long way from here.

2- The school is far way from here.

Tara21- The school is a long way from here.

Good. Idiomatic.

Tara22- The school is far way from here.

Not good. I don't anybody would say this.

CJ

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