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The Administrative Committee let buses stop 100m away down from the mountain so that tourists have a difficulty in approaching the hotels.

Does 'away down from' make sense?

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Hi Ahn,

Usually, in the US, "committee" takes a singular verb.

Down from the base of the mountain or away from (a particular place).

Have difficulty (not "a" difficulty)

The Administrative Committee lets buses stop 100 meters from the base of the mountain, so tourists have a difficult time approaching the hotels.
Thanks for your help, Grammar Geek.

I use 'let' as a past tense.

How about "the Administrative Committee let buses stop 100m down from the base of mountain so that tourists may have difficulty in approaching the hotels."?
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If let is past, then you shouldn't have "tourists have" in the present.
I see.
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the Administrative Committee let buses stop 100m away down from the base of the mountain so that tourists might have difficulty in approaching the hotels.

Then how about using 'might have'?
To me, the tense pairings that make sense are:

If the AC let the buses stop... mountain, the tourists might have difficulty... (not an actual situation - what may happen if they do this)

The AC let the buses stop... mountain, so the tourists had difficulty... (actual past)

Because the AC lets the buses stop... mountain, the tourists have difficulty (or are having difficulty) ... current actual situation

By the way, two other points:

1) "Let" is an interesting choice. That generally means give permission for something you are looking for. My mother let me stay out until midnight. My boss let me have a day off. You may want to use "permitted."

2) Your phrasing "They let... so that" makes is sound like the difficulty was the desired outcome. I'll let you borrow my car so that you have a way to get to your sister's.
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Thanks for your detailed explanation, Grammar Geek.

Sorry, I should have written the context.

The 'difficulty' tourists have is actually intended by the AC.

The AC wanted to demolish the hotels but the hotel managers denied it.

So they decided to let buses stop far away from the hotels so that tourists had a difficulty in going to the hotels. It was kind of a retaliatory measure.

I'll replace 'let' with 'permitted'.
Hi Ahn

I agree with GG's take on you sentence, but I think 'permitted' is just as bad as 'let' in this case. I might reword this way:

The Administrative Committee forced buses to stop 100m away from the base of the mountain so that tourists would have difficulty reaching the hotels.

Thank you, Yankee.

All the replies here are very helpful to me.
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