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Can I write,
(a) He was happy because he got / gets a baby girl.
(b) He was happy because he has /had a sister.
(c) He was happy because he got / gets a baby.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Grammar GeekWe welcome your contributions to the forum, but PLEASES accept that sometimes there are other people who can provide more natural conversation based on the way we've been speaking our entire lives.
At the risk of causing offence (not my intention I can assure you) I would like to ask the following question.
I know that native speakers are best placed to give their assessment on things - but
does it mean that native speakers are never wrong - and should we therefore always accept the "ruling" of a native speaker without question?
Maybe this is not the right place to ask this - sorry
Native speakers are often wrong, especially when it comes to saying "We say it THIS way" and someone from the UK says "Perhaps you do, but we say it THAT way." I have been wrong about many things myself.

When that happens, I say "Oh, really? I didn't realize that. To think I'd been saying it that way for years! Thanks." or words to that effect. (I screwed up compose/comprise recently.)

I may even say something like "Oh yes, of course. I was thinking about it in thus-and-such a way, but what you've said is much better for this situation."

What I do NOT do is scramble desperately for a context that would fit my suggestion, which I insist on claiming is correct, after MULTIPLE people have suggested otherwise. And at the risk of causing offense, this is not the first thread you have done this in.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
optilang
I know that native speakers are best placed to give their assessment on things - but

does it mean that native speakers are never wrong - and should we therefore always accept the "ruling" of a native speaker without question?

This is a reasonable question. I don't think anyone here would claim that native speakers are never wrong, and that every opinion of every native speaker should be accepted without question. Sometimes native speakers disagree with each other, expecially when there are differences between British and American English. However, particularly when it's a question of "what sounds natural" rather than grammar rules, the native speakers who have earned the titles in this forum of Proficient Speakers, Trusted Users and Moderators can usually be trusted -- especially when two or three of them concur. (That's why we have those designations -- so new members can get a quick idea of whose opinions are usually dependable.)
To further comment on khoff's post, you may notice a checkmark next to some poster's names. This indicates that they are proficient users of English (although there are many others who don't have this check - we'll catch up with them), and you can be guided by what they say.

And what a lovely piece of irony. I had a typo in PLEASES.
Thanks very much for your answer, Khoff
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Good morning, Barb! I see you are I are leapfrogging across each other today.
Optilang, you're welcome!

That's odd -- in the very post in which I was explaining the usefulness of the icons designating moderators, etc., I see that my own "moderator" icon has disappeared! Am I being punished for something? [:^)]
Thank you Grammar Geek for your comments
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Can I say,
John was happy because had a sister.
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