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Dear Teachers,

1) What is the difference about " believe" and "trust"?

2) If you don't clear off/get away, i will call the police.

3) They often go to bar/night-club in the weekend/in weekend.

4) The backstreetboys are probably the cutest/the cutest band.

- Are these ok to say?

5) You ever been to a bachelor party?

- Why don't we say " you have ever...."?

6) Have you ever heard of her?

- Can i say " heard about her"?

Thanks so much in advance.

Stevenukd.
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Yet, you can believe someone, and not trust him/her...
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Goldmund

3) They often go to bar/night-club in the weekend/in weekend.

Use «to a bar» or «to a night club». Use «at the weekend».

In AmE, we'd say 'on the weekend', or possibly, 'at the week's end'.

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Comments  


Dear sir,

1) What is the difference about " believe" and "trust"?

If you «believe» something, you think it is true.

If you «trust» someone, you think what he says is true. It will be bad for you if it is not true.

2) If you don't clear off/get away, i will call the police.

Use «clear off».

3) They often go to bar/night-club in the weekend/in weekend.

Use «to a bar» or «to a night club». Use «at the weekend».

4) The backstreetboys are probably the cutest/the cutest band.

It is correct but untrue. Emotion: smile

5) You ever been to a bachelor party?

- Why don't we say " you have ever...."?

It is colloquial. You may also say «have you ever been to a bachelor party?».

6) Have you ever heard of her?

It means «did you know that this person existed?»

- Can i say " heard about her"?

No. But you may say «have you heard about her?». It means «have you heard the latest story about her?».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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3 They often go to a bar [on the weekend / on weekends].
4 They are grammatically OK to say. Pragmatically, a male would not normally use this sentence. ("cute" applied to boys or men is a girl's or woman's word)
5 This is a shortening of "Have you ever been to ...?". In very casual conversation we occasionally leave out the helping verb which begins a question, especially when "you" is the subject.
6 "heard of her" is the correct idiom to use when it's a matter of recognizing the name or something equally vague. It is, however, idiomatic to ask "Have you ever heard anything about her?" when it's a matter of getting more information about some person already known to both parties of the conversation.

CJ