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Reading the bruch menu on Saturday, I saw this Bacon, ham or sausage and eggs (with toast)

- i thought that meant that i get BACON, a choice of ham or sausage and eggs. However, the waitress informed me that it was either bacon/ham/sausage. -

- Can someone please explain this to me.
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Hi,

Can someone please explain this to me. I'd say that, apparently, restaurant workers are not required to have skills in grammar or Boolean logic.

Best wishes, Clive
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When the communication is ambiguous, everybody gets to be right! Or wrong.

I think the pragmatics of the situation was supposed to disambiguate thus: The typical breakfast order consists of a meat, two eggs, and toast. This menu allowed three choices of the meat element. Some menus are clearer on these issues; some are not. I've seen that set-up listed as follows:

Two eggs and toast, and (your) choice of bacon, ham, or sausage.

I think that would have made you happier. Emotion: smile

CJ
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Comments  
the thing is that when i told her that, she flipped out and informed me that she had gone to unversity and that it was gramatically correct.
My 15 year old brother now gloats over the fact that I was wrong and I cannot find a "technical"explanation as to why I am indeed right.

-Bacon & Ham & Eggs
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

(ham+eggs+sausage).eggs.toast