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Which is correct, "That was written in bad English" or "That was written in poor English"?
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Actually, and speaking even more strictly, "bad" has several meanings.
One of them is "not good, unwanted or unacceptable". "Evil" is far from being the only meaning of "bad".
"Poor" means, in this sentence, "below the usual standard, low in quality".

"Poor" is often used by teachers, but either word can be used in the example.
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Comments  
Strictly speaking "bad" means evil. You are more precise if you write "That was written in poor English." However almost all English speakers say "bad" when they mean "poor." At this point you can get away with either poor or bad.
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 miriam's reply was promoted to an answer.
The phrases "That was written in bad English" and "That was written in poor English" are both far from perfect. "That was written using poor English" would get closer to the truth.
The phrases "That was written in bad English" and "That was written in poor English" are both far from perfect. "That was written using poor English" would get closer to the truth. "


Why?
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Yes, why?
And, what truth?
Wouldn't "that was written using poor English" be a misuse of a participle?

The writing, per se, was not done using any kind of English. It was done using a writing implement such as a pen or a computer. On the other hand, what began as a thought and emerged on the page was an example of poor English. The poor English first becomes perceptible when we see it subsisting in the text. Therefore, we would normally say, "that was written in poor English." We conceive the construction of the English phrasing, a logical function, as being separate from the writing process.

True, Miriam?
Hello, Brattania Emotion: smile

Honestly, I don't know if "using poor English" exists or is acceptable.

I've heard teachers tell their students to "use English" when they start speaking Spanish in the classroom. But then, those teachers are, like me, Argentinian, and English isn't our first language.

I agree that, strictly speaking, a word or sentence is written using a pen or a pencil. I wouldn't say "using English" myself, but I cannot say I'm sure it's wrong.

Miriam
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Use English is ok. It's like "use your English knowledge".
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