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Was that you, the English nation, who invented the tense that consists of a verb 'to have' in present simple tense form plus the Participle II of the lexical verb?
and the correct answer is - I don't care who invented it, I was brought up speaking English and using the perfect tenses the way everybody does around me and I don't give a hoot about who invented it or when and how it was used then or how it might still be used today in some other languages which I don't know and see no point of ever learning . (speaking as James Bond from your book)
Thank you. That's flattering indeed. I'm so impressed by that Office stuff, just can't get enough. Carell is the best world's actor of this very present moment. The way he carved Michael Scott has no precedents.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No, no, no, my friend, you have to choose between 'yes' and 'no'. Otherwise, you'll lose this battle you've been nagging me for a couple of weeks with. I could add 'I don't know' option, but this is not your case. You already know.

Come on, or you'll be known as Looser. People are watching.
Sorry, it's Loser. it doesn't allow to edit misprints.
it's a shame Carell left the office, now Andy Bernard is running things there, the show is still ok but not as good as it was when Carell was there
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

No, no, no, my friend, you have to choose between 'yes' and 'no'. Otherwise, you'll lose this battle you've been nagging me for a couple of weeks with. I could add 'I don't know' option, but this is not your case. You already know.

Come on, or you'll be known as Looser. People are watching.
What people?

anyway, I can see where you're going with this, if I say no it wasn't the English that 'invented' perfect tenses you will then go on to argue that since the English simply 'borrowed' perfect tenses they should have used them 'as is', i.e. in the same way they are used in the language (or languages) they took them from. But we'v already been there, haven't we.

So as James Bond I just say that a) I really don't know who invented perfect tenses (and I suppose you agree that most ordinary native speakers simply don't know the origins of their language) and b) I don't care how the inventors of the perfect tenses intended for them to be used, I simply use them the way everybody else uses them around me.

Etymology is a very intersting sciency in and of itself, but the origins and histories of languages affect their development/evolution in mysterious and often unpredictable ways and languages do change or rather they are constantly changing, it's a never ending process. Thus even when something gets borrowed from another language it seldom retains the same form and function as it had in the language it originated from.

You see, in the real world we can seldom set the rules of the battles we 'fight' and then expect our opponents to follow the rules we invent. In reality everyone is playing by their own rules which they make up as they go along.
Yes or no. One more chance.
ok, here you go

no
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OK, English nation did not invent the tense, known as Present Perfect in English grammar.

If I tell you that in Latin there was an identical tense formed with the verb "to have" in present simple tense form plus Participle II, will you agree that English grammarians borrowed this tense from Latin?
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