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What's the American for "Fains!", "Fain I!", "Vains!", "Vainites!", and ... doesn't get whatever thing or duty is in question.

"Not it!"

Ditto (b. 1964, Chicago).

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >So when can we quit passing laws and
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >raising taxes? When can we say ofPalo Alto, CA 94304 >our political system, "Stick a fork

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
I grew up in Chicago, and they were always "bags" for us, but the concentration of "sack" responses to the survey does seem to be centered around Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

A Midlandism, I'd presume. That would explain the West Coast "sack" users.
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Don't you say "He let the cat out of the bag?"

Which blows the whole scam when you're trying to get somebody to buy a pig in a poke.

Interestingly, in German that's "buy the cat in the sack", and we have the letting out one, too, so both idioms match.

ASCII to ASCII, DOS to DOS
Which blows the whole scam when you're trying to get somebody to buy a pig in a poke.

Interestingly, in German that's "buy the cat in the sack", and we have the letting out one, too, so both idioms match.

I think that the English one makes a bit more sense. While you clearly don't want to buy a cat in a sack (if what you're shopping for is a pig), you don't know that you're doing so. You do, however know that you're buying (what you believe to be) a pig in a poke. It may really be a pig, but it's likely enough that it isn't that you should be suspicious.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The reason that we don't have
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >"bear-proof" garbage cans in thePalo Alto, CA 94304 >park is that there is a significant
This header prompted me to ask a question I've been ... where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?

Not only noticed, but studied. A map of the distribution responses (in the US) to "What do you call the ... but the concentration of "sack" responses to the survey does seem to be centered around Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

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In Alabama in the '30s and '40s, it was a sack. A 'bag' was generally a burlap bag, more commonly known as a 'toe sack'.

And we didn't 'press' a button we 'mashed' it.
earle
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