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Noel Ildhund: Richard Fontana:

It's unknown in America.

Indeed. The parallel term I know is "dibs", as in "Dibs on the front seat!" (asserting a new claim) or "I have dibs on the front seat" (asserting an existing claim). Now, how widely is that used?

I grew up in California with this usage. There are also limited circumstances where it can be elided, e.g. "shotgun!" to claim the front passenger seat of the car (where the guy not driving the stagecoach sat carrying a shotgun to fend off the injuns).

Richard R. Hershberger
I grew up in California with this usage. There are also limited circumstances where it can be elided, e.g. "shotgun!" to claim the front passenger seat of the car (where the guy not driving the stagecoach sat carrying a shotgun to fend off the injuns).

I think we've mentioned before that "shotgun!" has among British youth now extended its meaning to cover the whole territory of "bags I!" etc, not just claiming the front passenger seat.

What's the American for "Fains!", "Fain I!", "Vains!", "Vainites!", and probably other variants? It has the opposite effect to "Bags!", in ensuring that the speaker doesn't get whatever thing or duty is in question.
Supplementary. Do British kids still call "Quis?" (often pronounced "Quiz?") if they want to give something away to the first person to shout "Ego!" It was, of course, sometimes a trap to get rid of something undesirable; in an alert crowd the thing would be forced on the last to shout "Fain I!"

Mike.
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Supplementary. Do British kids still call "Quis?" (often pronounced "Quiz?") if they want to give something away to the first person to shout "Ego!"

Ah, could this be related to "Leggo my Eggo"? Before Donna gets all enraged, I recall that my elder brother used to play a street game with other kids called "Leggo my Eggo" which had something to do with touching parking meter things.
Yes, the expression was proximately derived from Eggo frozen waffles, but perhaps there was an older origin.
Hi Ron!
Recent threads on such diverse topics as ecclesiastical Latin and shopping procedures have led me to speculate on the use ... in the sources I have to hand, and it seems not to have cropped up earlier in AUE or UCLE.

My older sister and I said "bagsie the front seat" (or whatever item was being contested). I probably learned it from her; no idea where she learned it.

SML
What's the American for "Fains!", "Fain I!", "Vains!", "Vainites!", and probably other variants? It has the opposite effect to "Bags!", in ensuring that the speaker doesn't get whatever thing or duty is in question.

The closest thing I can think of is "Safeties". If one farted, one had to call "Safeties" or a nearby party could punch the farter in the shoulder.
My brother was over here (from Denmark) for a visit recently. We were driving back from somewhere and he cut one loose and immediately said "Safties". I hadn't heard the expression for 50 or so years, but it immediately broke me up.
I was still laughing when we walked in the house, so I tried to explain it to my wife. She gave me that same look she would have given me 50-some years ago had I farted in her presence.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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The closest thing I can think of is "Safeties". If one farted, one had to call "Safeties" or a nearby ... She gave me that same look she would have given me 50-some years ago had I farted in her presence.

"How dare you do that before my wife, sir!" "Awfully sorry, old man! Was it her turn?"

Mike.
Supplementary. Do British kids still call "Quis?" (often pronounced "Quiz?") if they want to give something away to the first ... rid of something undesirable; in an alert crowd the thing would be forced on the last to shout "Fain I!"

I di this when I was a child, but I think we learnt it from my father rather than from our contemporaries, and I'm pretty sure I didn't pass it on to my own children. I haven't heard it recently.

Maybe, though, I could revive it with my grandchildren. And we could watch to see how quickly it spread.

Katy Jennison
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What's the American for "Fains!", "Fain I!", "Vains!", "Vainites!", and ... doesn't get whatever thing or duty is in question.

The closest thing I can think of is "Safeties". If one farted, one had to call "Safeties" or a nearby ... She gave me that same look she would have given me 50-some years ago had I farted in her presence.

This really adds new meaning to the term of Safeties Pens?
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I grew up in California with this usage. There are ... stagecoach sat carrying a shotgun to fend off the injuns).

I think we've mentioned before that "shotgun!" has among British youth now extended its meaning to cover the whole territory ... rid of something undesirable; in an alert crowd the thing would be forced on the last to shout "Fain I!"

I was born in 1938 and lived my entire childhood in Manhattan. "Finns" is very familiar to me. It was accompanied by crossing index and middle fingers, and was used to ensure one did not get something undesirable (being "it" in a game, for instance) and to avoid the consequences of an act that the other kids would find objectionable. You could pinch someone and he could not (theoretically) retaliate by pinching you back if you had held up your crossed fingers and yelled "I got finns!"
If done with both hands, it was extra powerful, and was "double finns".
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