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I think we've mentioned before that "shotgun!" has among ... would be forced on the last to shout "Fain I!"

I was born in 1938 and lived my entire childhood in Manhattan. "Finns" is very familiar to me. It was ... crossed fingers and yelled "I got finns!" If done with both hands, it was extra powerful, and was "double finns".

I find that really interesting. Thank you. I grew up in California in the 1960s and we didn't have either of the two eoncepts Mike asks about (Fains, Quis) among our childhood words.

Best Donna Richoux
I was born in 1938 and lived my entire childhood ... both hands, it was extra powerful, and was "double finns".

I find that really interesting. Thank you. I grew up in California in the 1960s and we didn't have either of the two eoncepts Mike asks about (Fains, Quis) among our childhood words.

I don't recall either existing across th'East River in Brooklyn (FLCIA) in the 1970s. Could be generational or, you know, two cities, two sets of customs.
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I find that really interesting. Thank you. I grew up in California in the 1960s and we didn't have either of the two eoncepts Mike asks about (Fains, Quis) among our childhood words.

For what it's worth, these are unfamiliar to me too.
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Noel Ildhund: Richard Fontana:

It's unknown in America.

Indeed. The parallel term I know is "dibs", as in "Dibs on the front seat!" (asserting a new claim) or "I have dibs on the front seat" (asserting an existing claim).

You guys spoke very properly. It would've been "I got dibs on the front seat" for us.
Now, how widely is that used?

It was the common term when I (b. 1964) was growing up in Chicago. I haven't noticed hearing it here in the Bay Area from my son (b. 1998) or his cohort.

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I was born in 1938 and lived my entire childhood in Manhattan. "Finns" is very familiar to me. It was ... crossed fingers and yelled "I got finns!" If done with both hands, it was extra powerful, and was "double finns".

I can confirm Pritsy's take on "finns", although I spent my entire childhood (b. 1942) across the East River in Queens. But then most of the people in my area were resettled from Manhattan and The Bronx and many of us still had cousins in those boroughs.
From reading some of the other comments it seems I should bring up the New York children's use of the word "hags". "Hags" is the same as "dibs" and was usually used to glom a portion of something that someone else had - a sip from their soda or a bite of their cake. The call would be, typically, "I got hags on your soda!" or "I got hags on that!" or more simply, "Hags on that!" It was a "street" way of saying, "May I try some of that?"
A slightly different way of calling "hags" would be if one child made it clear that they would be leaving leftovers of whatever they had, a bag of pretzels, french fries, etc., when someone went to dive in another would claim that they already had "hags" meaning they had first pick.
The similarity to "bags" is striking and I should point out that I lived in an area where many of the children had parents born in Ireland.
Brian
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It was the common term when I (b. 1964)

1965, I thought..
(And aren't you and Josh the same sign, by the way?)

Maria
I grew up in California with this usage. There are also limited circumstances where it can be elided, e.g. "shotgun!" to claim the front passenger seat of the car (where the guy not driving the stagecoach sat carrying a shotgun to fend off the injuns).

I'm familiar with that usage ("shotgun"), but not from childhood. I learned it when driving a carful of adults to work on a regular basis.

Maria Conlon.
Southeast Michigan, near Detroit.
It was the common term when I (b. 1964)

1965, I thought.. (And aren't you and Josh the same sign, by the way?)

This is interesting: one poster apparently got his birth date wrong and now you're suggesting that Evan has the wrong year (Ron seems to have done too but only because he was trying to be clever). I sometimes forget the dates and years of my childrens' birthdays but never my own.

Laura
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Indeed. The parallel term I know is "dibs", as in "Dibs on the front seat!" (asserting a new claim) or "I have dibs on the front seat" (asserting an existing claim). Now, how widely is that used?

That's the term I grew up with well, say from age 8 or so. I remember learning it from my aunt (my mother's baby sister, who was just 21 months older than me). I learned a lot of things from her, from childhood until she died about 10 years ago. She envied my "book learning"; I envied her "people knowledge." ("Street smarts" is close, but no cigar.)
Maria Conlon
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