1 2 3  5 6 7 8 10
Now, how widely is that used?

It was the common term when I (b. 1964) was growing up in Chicago. I haven't noticed hearing it here in the Bay Area from my son (b. 1998) or his cohort.

Another pre/post-Tet difference, perhaps. OCH.
It was the common term when I (b. 1964)

1965, I thought..

I thought so too. Erk, not that it makes any difference, but which year was it?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I can confirm Pritsy's take on "finns", although I spent my entire childhood (b. 1942) across the East River in ... that!" or more simply, "Hags on that!" It was a "street" way of saying, "May I try some of that?"

I don't remember that one either.
The similarity to "bags" is striking and I should point out that I lived in an area where many of the children had parents born in Ireland.

I wonder if that's relevant in my case. I grew up in an area that had some (and historically a lot) but, by then, only a minority, of persons of Irish descent, and far fewer of proximate Anglo-British background (and those would tend to be persons whose parents had moved to the area from some other region of the US). Moreover, a lot of the kids who were Irish tended to get shipped off to parochial school (NTTAWWT(HC)). The majority ethnic group in my neighborhood, if there was one, would have been Ashkenazic-Jewish, and demographic changes were in the direction of increasing diversity and decreasing northwestern-Europeanicity.
Mark Brader:
Indeed. The parallel term I know is "dibs", as in ... have dibs on the front seat" (asserting an existing claim).

Evan Kirshenbaum:
You guys spoke very properly. It would've been "I got dibs on the front seat" for us.

"Spoke", past tense? Not for me.

Mark Brader, Toronto > "Most people are other people. Their thoughts (Email Removed) > are someone else's opinions..." Oscar Wilde
1965, I thought..

I thought so too. Erk, not that it makes any difference, but which year was it?

Sigh. '64. Did I really say '65? Sorry.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >When correctly viewed,
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 > Everything is lewd.Palo Alto, CA 94304 >I could tell you things
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Mark Brader: Evan Kirshenbaum:

You guys spoke very properly. It would've been "I got dibs on the front seat" for us.

"Spoke", past tense? Not for me.

You had verbs??
I mostly remember just "Dibs on the front seat!" (or on whatever. I was never particularly keen to ride in the front seat). (SoCal, around the time Evan was busy being born elsewhere).

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Supplementary. Do British kids still call "Quis?" (often pronounced "Quiz?") if they want to give something away to the first ... rid of something undesirable; in an alert crowd the thing would be forced on the last to shout "Fain I!"

I have a strong suspicion (given the Latin roots) that this negotiating protocol (which I too am familiar with) has its provenance in the English preparatory and public school environments.
It lasted longer than referring to one's parents as Mater and Pater (died in Edwardian times I think) but we did still refer to them as "my people".
"Are your people coming down for the half-term exeat?"

The other related curiosity I remember had to do with what we called our fellow students when not using a nicknmame. We used their last name (surname we called it) and if there were multiples of a given name, then we added a Major, Minor, or Minimus to the name to disambiguate it - sometimes shortened to Ma, Mi, or Min respectively.
"Sir! Anderson Min just farted!"
"Sir! Brown Ma has a bleeding nose."
Then there was the "turf" protocol. This was a mechanism where a senior pupil could announce "turf" and thus displace a more junior colleague from a desireable seat in the cricket pavilion or in line at the tuck shop or similar situation.
The ability to turf was derived from your overall value based on three factors
a) Age
b) What class (grade) attending
c) Longevity so far at that school.
If you beat the other guy on at least 2 of these 3 factors, you got to "turf" him.
We were such sweet kids,
Jitze
It lasted longer than referring to one's parents as Mater and Pater (died in Edwardian times I think)

My brother and I still occasionally refer to our parents as Pater and Mater. It's not quite dead.
The other related curiosity I remember had to do with what we called our fellow students when not using a ... a Major, Minor, or Minimus to the name to disambiguate it - sometimes shortened to Ma, Mi, or Min respectively.

At my school the use of "major", etc., was confined to brothers. Unrelated boys with identical surnames were disambiguated(1) by their initials.
However, my brother and I caused some problems with that scheme. Few people could tell us apart, and no one was willing to guess which one of us was the elder. (I have no idea why they didn't just ask.) So we, too, were addressed by our surname and initials. When the atmosphere was a little more informal, they just used our initials.

(1) We didn't use that word.

Graeme Thomas
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
From reading some of the other comments it seems I should bring up the New York children's use of the ... that!" or more simply, "Hags on that!" It was a "street" way of saying, "May I try some of that?"

If memory serves, Leo Rosten in The Joys of Yiddish reports on a similar use of "dibs" to stake a claim to a share of what someone else has received or found. (He memorably conjurs up his childhood vision of one desperate, grizzled old prospector in the gold country Out West attempting to call dibs half in English, half in Yiddish, of course on another who has struck gold on the adjoining claim).
That usage of "dibs", used like "hags" as explained above to enforce sharing, is a meaning outside of my experience of the word. We always used it to claim exclusive possession or control of some asset or privilege, which would be due, by right, to whoever succeded in being the first to call dibs.

Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Show more