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This header prompted me to ask a question I've been meaning to ask for some time. I grew up in and around N.Y. calling the paper and plastic things merchants put goods in bags. However, a Midwestern friend says these things are called sacks where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?
Tim
This header prompted me to ask a question I've been meaning to ask for some time. I grew up in ... However, a Midwestern friend says these things are called sacks where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?

At our markets in Southern California, we get to choose whether the box boy puts our stuff in plastic bags or paper sacks.
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This header prompted me to ask a question I've been ... where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?

At our markets in Southern California, we get to choose whether the box boy puts our stuff in plastic bags or paper sacks.

SoCal is pretty deviant. Sacks are for coal, and paper's no good for that.
What's the American for "Fains!", "Fain I!", "Vains!", "Vainites!", and probably other variants? It has the opposite effect to "Bags!", in ensuring that the speaker doesn't get whatever thing or duty is in question.

"Not it!"

Alan Curry
SoCal is pretty deviant. Sacks are for coal,

... and cats.

J.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
SoCal is pretty deviant. Sacks are for coal,

... and cats.

Don't you say "He let the cat out of the bag?" But then, there's "Kits, cats, sacks, and wives: how many are going to Altoona?"

Best - Donna Richoux
here, here!
...you need to join the "wear a cat as a hat" league.
SoCal is pretty deviant. Sacks are for coal,

... and cats.

Sacks are also to hit when you retire for the night.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
SoCal is pretty deviant. Sacks are for coal,

... and cats.

Just you wait till Rey gets back, me laddo.
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