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The other related curiosity I remember had to do with ... it - sometimes shortened to Ma, Mi, or Min respectively.

Ooh, I was thinking about this just the other day. What happens if there are four boys with the same name (related or un)?

I can only remember this happening once and they were known respectively as Andersons Major, Minor, Minimus and Four. The problem came when the first of these left "the remove" and a new Anderson entered the school in the "titchies" class.

The question now arose as to whether this new arrival should become the new four, while the others moved up a rank (which would cause serious confusion as everybody's name changed) or whether the new arrival should don the mantle of Major.

In the end this was resolved by neither of these options, but damned if I can remember how.
Jitze
Ooh, I was thinking about this just the other day. What happens if there are four boys with the same name (related or un)?

I can only remember this happening once and they were known respectively as Andersons Major, Minor, Minimus and Four. The ... of Major. In the end this was resolved by neither of these options, but damned if I can remember how.

I sort-of-assume that the four markers would have been max, ma, mi and min, but never met it in Real Life. This would indeed have meant a satisfying promotion for the erstwhile ma, mi and min, especially for the eldest if their surname had, improbably, been Pontifex.
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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This header prompted me to ask a question I've been ... where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?

To me a sack is made of woven fibre, a bag is made of smooth stuff (plastic, leather, paper). There ... seem to have the same cachet. But hey, it's Easter today, and I left my bagcloth garment at the church.

And today our pasqueflower has bloomed. An orthodox plant, we see.
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
Linz filted:
Ooh, I was thinking about this just the other day. What happens if there are four boys with the same name (related or un)?

Some years back, Reader's Digest related the story of a small town with three ministers, all named "Wright"...the one who lived on a hill acquired the nickname "Upright", the one in the valley was known as "Downright", and the one who lived on an estate in the country was "Outright"...when a fourth minister of the same name improbably set up shop in the same town, he became known as "Forthright"..r
Ooh, I was thinking about this just the other day. What happens if there are four boys with the same name (related or un)?

I can only remember this happening once and they were known respectively as Andersons Major, Minor, Minimus and Four. The problem came when the first of these left "the remove" and a new Anderson entered the school in the "titchies" class.

Thanks for that, Jitze!

The point of education is to correct ignorance. It cannot deal with stupidity. (Mortimer Hebblethwaite, uk.misc)
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Robert Lieblich filted:

And in some parts of the South, it's a "poke"..

I expected more. And who'da thunk "bag " was a Google whack?

18 hits for "poke lunch", some of which are actually the equivalent of the expressions above (others include a lunch containing the green "poke" as an ingredient)...no hits at all for "poke ", which actually surprises me..r

In NY, we say F K the quarterback, sometimes with UP. LOL
Tim Singer wrote on 03 May 2005:
In NY, we say F K the quarterback,

Do you really say "Eff-double-underline-kay the quaterback"?

That's a screamer.
sometimes with UP. LOL

"Eff-double-underline-kay up the quaterback"? That's even more of a screamer. You guys in NY are pretty *** up, I'd say.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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"You've got to get over this idea that there's a rule for everything." Professor John Lawler, U. Michigan
... and cats.

Don't you say "He let the cat out of the bag?"

Which blows the whole scam when you're trying to get somebody to buy a pig in a poke.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Never ascribe to malice that which
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This header prompted me to ask a question I've been meaning to ask for some time. I grew up in ... However, a Midwestern friend says these things are called sacks where he comes from. Has anyone else noticed this dichotomy?

Not only noticed, but studied. A map of the distribution responses (in the US) to "What do you call the paper container in which you might bring home items you bought at the store?" can be found at

http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q 109.html

I grew up in Chicago, and they were always "bags" for us, but the concentration of "sack" responses to the survey does seem to be centered around Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >If the human brain were so simple
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >That we could understand it,Palo Alto, CA 94304 >We would be so simple

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