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Hi

I'm not sure if it's OK to write: bailment agreement of an apartment.

maybe it's better to write residential premises or living accommodation instead of apartment?

thanks
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If it's an apartment, then call it an apartment. Everybody knows what that means. If there's some special qualifier that's important to the agreement and you need help describing it, then let's have it.

"Bailment" must be British. I have no idea what that means.
Bailment = the delivery of personal property returnable to the bailor after being held for some purpose.

It is an American legal term, not a British one.
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Hi

Do you think that the bailment agreement may mean the same as a contract of lending for use?

I'm just wondering how it is better to write:

1. BAILMENT AGREEMENT OF AN APARTMENT

2. APARTMENT BAILMENT AGREEMENT

3. CONTRACT OF LENDING FOR USE AN APARTMENT

Which of them sounds best? Or maybe none?
I'd say, BAILMENT AGREEMENT FOR AN APARTMENT

But then, I've never seen it written. Check google.

Does it mean the landlord holds a lean on your furniture?
AvangiI'd say, BAILMENT AGREEMENT FOR AN APARTMENT

But then, I've never seen it written. Check google.

Does it mean the landlord holds a lean on your furniture?

Why furniture? I think it just means that I will rent an apartment from someone else. As for google, I haven't found anything interesting.
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bailment = transfer of goods by one person (the bailor) to another (the bailee) who then holds them until they have to be returned to the bailor, e.g. the process of leaving a coat in a cloakroom or at the cleaner's.
Since Feebs mentioned (and it is also notable from this example) that bailment refers to personal property, and as far as I am concerned the apartment is a real property, it can only refer to its equipment, e.g. furniture
This is beginning to sound more like leaving your furniture at a storage warehouse then like renting an apartment. That is also like leaving your car with a mechanic. In both cases there's a lien on your property until you pay the bill.

Is this apartment furnished or unfurnished?

Feebs says this is an America legal term. Having rented many US apartments, I wonder why I've never heard it? I've also signed contracts with "movers," who have posession of all your goods for a period of time.
"Bailment" is certainly not just an American legal term. It is alive and well (if not often seen out) in English law (I cannot speak for Scottish law).
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