re: Banty page 2

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Maria Conlon wrote in message M-W Online has this to ...

Yes "bandy." Not "banty" (and not usually followed by "around").

Makes me think of badminton for some reason.
Has California Democrat Lorretta Sanchez given us something new in the term "banty"? And "banty around"? The quote below is ... know. "Banty" may be more widespread that I would have thought. Have you heard it, um, "bantied" about? Or "around"?

I would guess this is connected with the variability of the t/d boundary in English. In some parts of the US, t and d are so close (to my ear) that it doesn't surprise me that someone would misinterpret one for the other. By this I mean that the lady has heard "bandy" much more often than she has seen it in print, and has wrongly come to the conclusion that it's spelt with a t. She's not alone: there are a couple hundred "banty about"s on the Web.
btw, is it a new trend, to reply to posts without reading them?

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Has California Democrat Lorretta Sanchez given us something new in ... thought. Have you heard it, um, "bantied" about? Or "around"?

I would guess this is connected with the variability of the t/d boundary in English. In some parts of the ... conclusion that it's spelt with a t. She's not alone: there are a couple hundred "banty about"s on the Web.

..and there are a lot of "strutting around like a banty rooster..", with chest puffed out sometimes. As I find whenever I do a 'vanity search' in order to pick up any missed responses. Which is how, of course, I found this thread.

Banty has had a decades-long honorable presence on Usenet, and is horrified that her noble moniker would have fallen upon the vile lips of Rumsfield for any reason.
Cheers,
Banty
(snip discussion of "banty" as misspelling/mispronunciation of "bandy" - I have not encountered this yet myself)
Yes "bandy." Not "banty" (and not usually followed by "around").

Makes me think of badminton for some reason.

Looks like there might be good reason for that. M-W can't provide any solid etymology of "bandy," but the first meanings relate to batting a thing back and forth, before it moves on to an exchange of words:

Etymology: origin unknown
Date: 1577
transitive verb

1 : to bat (as a tennis ball) to and fro
2 a : to toss from side to side or pass about fromone to another often in a careless or inappropriate manner b : EXCHANGE; especially : to exchange
(words) argumentatively c : to discuss lightly or
banteringly d : to use in a glib or offhand manner often used with about

Does anyone definitely remember using it in sense l?

Best Donna Richoux
Looks like there might be good reason for that. M-W can't provide any solid etymology of "bandy," but the first ... about Does anyone definitely remember using it in sense l?

No, but I've got a book of sports rules that includes a game called "bandy". Basically field hockey on ice.
(No! I'm serious! Curved sticks, ball, eleven on a side, no play behind the net, 65m x 110m rink.)

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I would guess this is connected with the variability of ... alone: there are a couple hundred "banty about"s onthe Web.

..and there are a lot of "strutting around like a banty rooster..", withchest puffed out sometimes. As I find whenever ... presence on Usenet, and ishorrified that her noble moniker would have fallen upon the vile lips of Rumsfield forany reason.

Wow, I don't think we've ever gotten an actual response from a word before!
Looks like there might be good reason for that. M-W ... Pollak> Does anyone definitely remember using it in sense l?

No, but I've got a book of sports rules that includes a game called "bandy". Basically field hockey on ice. (No! I'm serious! Curved sticks, ball, eleven on a side, no play behind the net, 65m x 110m rink.)

I, for one, wouldn't doubt you for a minute. (Besides, it's in Google. )
I did check "badinage," but that's related to "banter," and I don't see a relationship between "banter" and "bandy" /as used/. Even so, there may be a mental connection between the two words for others.

In any case, the word in the sense that Sanchez(1) used it is "bandy," not "banty." I do wonder, however, if the pronunciation could be attributed to the influence of the Spanish (Mexican) language.

By the way, I spelled Sanchez's first name "Lorretta" in my original post, as I had seen it in print that way. It is, however, "Loretta." (And her mother's name is Maria.)
Maria Conlon
.>> No, but I've got a book of sports rules that includes a game called

"bandy". Basically field hockey on ice. (No! I'm serious! Curved sticks, ball, eleven on a side, no play behind the net, 65m x 110m rink.)

I, for one, wouldn't doubt you for a minute. (Besides, it's in Google. )

When I wrote "field hockey on ice", I looked at it and said "Some smart alec is going to say 'Isn't that called "ice hockey"?'"(1)

(1) There's a string of punctuation you don't get to use every day.

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Pleased to make your acquaintance.
Banty
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