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Hi all,

I just met this phrase, and tried looking it up in an on-line dictionary, but it wasn't there.

Could anyone tell be about it? Is it at least correct?

P.S.: I seem to have understood the meaning: "based on".
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Hi,

I just met this phrase, and tried looking it up in an on-line dictionary, but it wasn't there.

Could anyone tell be about it? Is it at least correct?

P.S.: I seem to have understood the meaning: "based on".
Both of these seem definitely substandard to me.

Actually, as a further point, I feel the same way about any use of '... off of ...' (eg It fell off of the table, He jumped off of the cliff'). But this battle is almost lost, because I hear this usage so often.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
omit the "of". The sentence will remain the same; "I jumped off of the horse" is the same as "I jumped off the horse". "Off of" has become part of descriptive English, where it seems OK, but is really slang.